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A nice Japanese paint brush box with ivory man

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shrine's loves29 of 32Mud menCANDELIERE CONTRAPUNTO DA ROS  / CENEDESE
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    Posted 9 years ago

    Phatbuddha
    (220 items)

    A nice Japanese paint brush box with ivory man. This was Another good find its marks are on the mans feet, it's not the best Carving but it's still got a good look.

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    Comments

    1. Zowie Zowie, 9 years ago
      It sure is different i have never seen anything like it lucky you
    2. Master Master, 6 years ago
      Very nice indeed
    3. apostata apostata, 27 days ago
      Traditionally, Japanese clothing - first the kosode and its later evolution, the kimono - did not have pockets. Though the sleeves of the kimono could be used to store small items, the men who wore kimono needed a larger and stronger container in which to store personal belongings, such as pipes, tobacco, money and seals, resulting in the development of containers known as sagemono, which were hung by cords from the robes' sashes (obi).

      These containers may have been pouches or small woven baskets, but the most popular were crafted boxes (inro) held shut by ojime, sliding beads on cords. Whatever the form of the container, the fastener that secured the cord at the top of the sash was a carved, button-like toggle called a netsuke. Netsuke, like inro and ojime, evolved over time from being strictly utilitarian into objects of great artistic merit, and an expression of extraordinary craftsmanship. Netsuke production was most popular during the Edo period (1615-1868).

      Netsuke and inro declined as Japanese clothes were gradually westernized from the Meiji period (1868?1912). Since they were popular among Western collectors at that time, the higher the quality of their works, the more they were exported, and now, the higher the quality of their works, the more they are in museums or private collectors in foreign countries than in Japan.[1]

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