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American Base Railroad Photograph, Horses and Soliders Unknow exact Year

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    Posted 6 years ago

    mikeigotit
    (481 items)

    This old Photograph measures 8-3/4 " x 6-1/2" and is from the PRESS ILLUSTRATING SERVICE, New York. I do not know what year this is from, looking at the troops and the tall building in the background throws me off. Any help with this photo, will be greatly appreciated.

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    Comments

    1. scottvez scottvez, 6 years ago
      WW1 era press photo from overseas-- probably France.

      scott
    2. PostCardCollector PostCardCollector, 6 years ago
      Really interesting!
    3. mikeigotit mikeigotit, 6 years ago
      Thanks guys !!!!
    4. verretcheque verretcheque, 6 years ago
      Looking at the photo, probably autumn of 1918, as General Pershing arrived in the mid-summer with his troops.

      " Some horse units of the 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 15th Cavalry regiments accompanied the US forces in Europe. The soldiers worked mainly as grooms and farriers, attending to remounts for the artillery, medical corps and transport services. It was not until late August 1918 that US cavalry entered combat. A provisional squadron of 418 officers and enlisted men, representing the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, and mounted on convalescent horses, was created to serve as scouts and couriers during the St. Mihiel Offensive. On September 11, 1918, these troops rode at night through no man's land and penetrated five miles behind German lines. Once there, the cavalry was routed and had to return to Allied territory. Despite serving through the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, by mid-October the squadron was removed from the front with only 150 of its men remaining." (Wikipedia)
    5. mikeigotit mikeigotit, 6 years ago
      VERRETCHEQUE, Thank You for the info. Wow, After reading for hours and looking at pictures No Doubt to the Era!!!!! Thanks again my friend.
    6. verretcheque verretcheque, 6 years ago
      No problem. One railhead can be discounted. Camp Williams, at Is-sur-Tille, near Dijon, was the A.E.F's new build camp in 1917, completed in March 1918.
      Troops and supplies arrived via St Nazaire or Bordeaux, with the rail-lines from both ports joining at Bourges, and continuing via Nevers to Dijon and Camp Williams.
    7. mikeigotit mikeigotit, 6 years ago
      A great wealth of information I really appreciate it
    8. scottvez scottvez, 6 years ago
      How is that "discounted"?

      Additionally, I wouldn't characterize these as cavalry troops.

      I don't see anything that suggests cav troops or horses-- most horses in WW1 were in a combat support role.

      The larger leather harness near the necks suggests that they are being used in a "pulling" mode.

      scott
    9. verretcheque verretcheque, 6 years ago
      Discounted?? Simply there were no appartment blocks in Is-Sur-Tille at the time. Nor at Camp Williams.
      By 1917, the American military were already aware that cavalry warfare was a non-starter, and having raised and trained several new cavalry regiments, on realisation that these were not going to be used as cavalry, redeployed these units as horse artillery, logistics and ambulance teams.

      As noted in the Wikipedia quote, those remaining cavalry units were mainly used in logistical support.

      I did not infer that the horses in the image were cavalry horses.


    10. verretcheque verretcheque, 6 years ago
      http://www.francegenweb.org/~wiki/index.php/Is-sur-Tille,_le_camp_am%C3%A9ricain

      Camp Williams
    11. verretcheque verretcheque, 6 years ago
      The names of the 238 Americans who died of their wounds at the hospital at Camp Williams, following their evacuation from the front-line are recorded here:
      http://www.memorialgenweb.org/memorial3/html/fr/resultcommune.php?idsource=990821
    12. scottvez scottvez, 6 years ago
      While this may represent a US Camp location, if you desire to find the location; I wouldn't limit your search to known US Camps.

      Rail was used to transport troops/ horses/ equipment throughout the theater.

      As verretcheque stated, the tall building is key in eliminating certain cities or areas.

      Good luck, in specific location ID.

      scott
    13. mikeigotit mikeigotit, 6 years ago
      THANKS SCOTT,

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