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Any ideas as to what this is?

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Savoychina1's items1 of 650Savoy China, made in USA, 24KT gold Black Memorabilia collection.
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    Posted 2 years ago

    Savoychina1
    (650 items)

    I am looking for any information on this item. Farm tool of some sort? Clearly, hand made. It is approximately two foot overall. The wood is smooth from age. What appears to be a hand forged clip, sits above the gear and can be used to "lock" the gear /handle in place.

    Unsolved Mystery

    Help us close this case. Add your knowledge below.

    Comments

    1. bobby725 bobby725, 2 years ago
      possibly for turning quilts on a quilt rack?
    2. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 2 years ago
      And just when I thought I had seen everything. LOL!
    3. Watts, 2 years ago
      Making wool ?
    4. TallCakes TallCakes, 2 years ago
      maybe some sort of primitive skein winder
    5. UncleRon UncleRon, 2 years ago
      The two pointed pins suggest that it was intended to be "attached" only temporarily and then removed for re-use. For example: it could have been pushed into a bundle of something and a cord wrapped around the bundle and tied to the iron loop in the top (rotating) rod could be tightened by the ratchet mechanism, tightening the bundle. When the cord was tied off the tool was removed and the process repeated.
    6. hotairfan hotairfan, 1 year ago
      This is a corn shock tying tool. Used to gather the corn shocks into a tight bunch, then a cord of bailing twine was wrapped tight around the shock and the tool could then be removed to use on the next shock in the field.
      Some "Old Amish Orders" still use these instruments in Pennsylvania.

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