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Early 19th Century Heckle for "Anything Obscure" - goes with your flax breaker - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
59 Year Old Wedding Cake in a Can - Mmmmmm! - Kitchenin Kitchen
What are these things? And the mystery is solved! - Asianin Asian
For Bigship_Iron - A typical Horseman's knife. - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Japanese Metal Applique Button or Glove Hook - Accessoriesin Accessories
Antique Ambidextrous Scissors - 1881 - Sewingin Sewing
Odd Handtool Marked Park-Aid - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Convert your Circular Saw to a Chainsaw! - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Humpfreys "Safety" Double Snap Bolt for Breast Chains and Traces Pat'd 1888 - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
18th Century Bronze Henna "Tatoo" Stamps - Accessoriesin Accessories

Comments

  1. This is a Puukko - the traditional general purpose outdoor knife of Finland. The handle is made of stacked and compressed birch bark.
  2. The USA mark is by Colonial Knife Co. (not Colonial Cutlery Co.) - 1926 thru ca. 2000. The way you can tell is if you examine the bolsters carefully you will see that they are not individual, solid p...
  3. Agree with lzenglish. Start with butcher's knives.
  4. Generic Mediterranean area dagger, from Spain. The macho engravings say "Live (the life of) the man of honor" & "the traitors (will) die" which is sort of like saying "the honorable man will kill the ...
  5. Interesting site. It does show a lot of Talwar swords and it also shows a link to your exact blade & scabbard identified as "A vintage Indian Talwar sword with . . . the disk pommel characteristic of...
  6. It is some kind of bayonet from Spain. (Toledo is a cutlery manufacturing center in Spain, as Sheffield is in England, for example.) Go to Google and type in "artilleria bayonet."
  7. This appears to be a "punal" or Argentinian gaucho's knife.
  8. It can't be a plumb bob because there is no way to attach a string. It MIGHT be a "plumber's turnip" for flaring lead pipe, although it is much bigger than they usually are.
  9. If it was "real" it wouldn't have a teeny little tang like that which appears to have been simply glued into the handle.
  10. You are correct Onedetent. It is definitely not a de-horner. They are built similarly but they have sharp blades like a robust tree pruner or a guillotine sort of tool. I think someone wrote that he h...
  11. It is definitely an old muzzle-loading shotgun. That is an old European-style stock treatment and you can see the trigger and the percussion lock on the stock. He is loading it with a ramrod. He is a ...
  12. OK. What part hooks onto the bailing wire and after it's pulled tighter how is the tension maintained?
  13. The one with the large, flat flag is for a watchman's time station. As he makes his rounds he must insert a numbered key, chained to a specific location, into his clock at specific times. The number &...
  14. Interesting! How about some additional pictures illustrating what you're talking about (i.e. how it works). It appears to have some kind of mounting plate at the bottom? What does the back look like?
  15. OK. First that's not verdigris. Verdigris (from the French "vert de Grece" or "the green of Greece") is a blue/green oxide of copper which forms on brass. Second, cleaning an antique with Brasso, or a...
  16. I agree with blunderbuss2. It looks like a heavy-duty "hollow auger" with the advantage that there is no maximum length to the area to be reduced - you just keep moving it down the stock, making a dow...
  17. It is a cooper's adze.
  18. This is about the fourth time one of these has been posted here over a couple of years and nobody has ever given a definitive answer about what it was used for. You'll get a lot of wild guesses. Funct...
  19. This is an early router used in cabinet making & wood joinery. Google translate didn't help. Hungarian is the closest language but its not syntactic.
  20. It appears to be a saw set with an adjustable-angle stop. DRGM is an abbreviation used on and off in Germany up to WWII which means, basically, "registered design."
  21. I can't tell the age but I have seen innumerable similar wing dividers and they usually have a locking thumb-screw with either a solid pad for the grip or a flat, round head such as the one on the fin...
  22. If I understand your question, what you are seeing is simply the swedges on the badly worn-down the tips of the blades. Manufacturers often cut a bevel on a blade's spine, near the tip, in order to ...
  23. Look at pic #3. The cutting teeth are too far up inside the handle for a corner to touch them. The teeth are very aggressive but still a file. Also found one with a more narrow gap between the handles...
  24. Ice skate blade file
  25. Whales do not have an oosic (baculum), or "penis bone." You 're thinking of walruses.
  26. The Ripper is probably from the 1970s to '80s. The wolf knife is no older than the 1990s and could well be from the 2000s.
  27. Intriguing. Some thoughts, for what it's worth: The thing this key unlocked would have required some security, like a utility-control box, but the actual locking mechanism was not too rugged. It was p...
  28. Also, drop some baby powder, talc, or cornstarch on it and rub over it.
  29. This is a protractor used in navigation. A nearly identical one dated "Ca. 1880" is show on this site: http://www.sliderulemuseum.com/Rarities.htm
  30. Union Cutlery Co., Olean, N.Y. used the trade name KA-Bar from ca. 1925 and changed its name to KA-BAR Cutlery Co. in 1952. It later became Ka-Bar, then ka-bar and finally kabar, as the company went t...
  31. There are many variations of the Schrade tang stamp. The one on your knife was used from 1946 to 1973. What was made in France was the Stanhope lens. Your knife appears to be in at least near-mint con...
  32. Very new - probably 20 years old at most and probably from Pakistan.
  33. Gottlieb Hammesfahr (1804- 1971) - one of many Hammesfahrs who operated in Germany - registered "Nirosta" in 1921.
  34. Just a guess: I think this is a tool for opening a utility company's service caps, or water valves, etc., that take oddball wrench shapes which are designed to prevent just anybody with a wrench from...
  35. The handle and the sheath are cast from a zinc(?) alloy and coated with a gold paint. This is demonstrated by the many worn high spots which show the paint worn off to reveal a gray metal beneath it. ...
  36. It could open a can of paint but it would be hard to use in that manner and there's no reason to have that semi-circular hooked part. Paint can openers are straight and have a tiny, wide, and flatten...
  37. There are two German firms which used "Ideal" as one of their trademarks but neither one was in business until after 1901. The Belknap Hardware company in Louisville, KY, in business ca. 1890, used t...
  38. I'm with flashlarue. The handle is buffalo horn with brass and aluminum spacers. Based on the decoration on the sheath I'd have to guess African.
  39. Probably a piece of architectural decoration; above a doorway, etc. Possibly off of a piece of large furniture.
  40. The name for this device around here, in Hempfield Township no less, is a "Flax Breaker." Flax & hemp have a hard brittle shell, like a straw, around the inner fibers which are used to make thread (fl...
  41. The handle style - with the split/flared butt - is typically Greek.
  42. The style of your handle and the decoration of the sheath is typical of the Canary Islands. The knife appears to be apx. 100+/- years old
  43. Obviously the value here is not for the knife per. se., but as an Olympics souvenir; and especially because of the significance of the 1936 Olympics. Still, condition is a factor. It shows considerabl...
  44. In a tinsmith's shop they were heated in a small coal-fired (and later gas) stove, about the size of a shoebox. PS. The ends are copper.
  45. The RCC on the bolster indicates Robeson Cutlery Co. - probably pre-1950s, but I'd have to see the exact tang stamp to be able to date it. The handles are polished bone.
  46. There are a bunch of railroad-related Green Lines. He may have worked in the shop, as a blacksmith, or perhaps a locomotive fireman.
  47. The iron piece may be a tooth from the bucket of a power digging machine or a drag- harrow for leveling a recently plowed field. The glass pieces are really cool. Without the hole in the bottom t...
  48. And on the weekends you go to the Atlantic City boardwalk and scam the rubes with a Pea & Cup table.
  49. M. H. Cole states in his "US Military Knives Book III" (1979) that these knives continue (at that time) to be produced by some of the firms which supplied the military but they are "commercial" knives...
  50. You mean like the mall? (rimshot) These hammers were the forerunners of the deadblow hammer which is a modern miracle. :-)
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