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Convert your Circular Saw to a Chainsaw! - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Humpfreys "Safety" Double Snap Bolt for Breast Chains and Traces Pat'd 1888 - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
18th Century Bronze Henna "Tatoo" Stamps - Accessoriesin Accessories
Humphrey Tool Co. Tool/Screwdriver set - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Beymer Bauman Co Bucket of Lead Pigment for making paint 1870 - 1900 - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Unusual Motion Lamp with "Table Lamp" Top Fixture - Lampsin Lamps
Keen Kutter Physician's Knife - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Unknown Pure White Pepper Tin "MA- - - - - & Cos." - Advertisingin Advertising
Tatum's Cast Iron What? Ink well holder? Caster? Pin holder?  - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Molinillo - Mexican Hot Chocolate Mixer - Kitchenin Kitchen

Comments

  1. Here's a thought: It's a water trap. Fuel floats on water and would have less buoyancy than water. The mercury globe is precisely calibrated to just under the specific gravity of water but greater tha...
  2. Why would the mercury spin as fluid passes through the outer bowl? The mercury doesn't touch anything except the bulb it is in. It can't impart any centrifugal action. Sediment bowls are generally on ...
  3. OK. So what's the mercury for?
  4. Irishcollector got it right.
  5. Technically, these are field glasses, not binoculars. Without any identifying markings the best guess for origin is France.
  6. It looks like half of a soft-boiled egg opener. A second one would be hinged with it at the small hole and you squeeze them around the top of the egg to crack the shell evenly. Of course I can't tell ...
  7. Yezbut: The Yellow Kid generally didn't wear a hat - he was illustrated bald. In some cartoons he wore a hat that was indicative of the theme of the cartoon, such as a top hat when he was supposed to ...
  8. He sorta looks like the Yellow Kid. Look up Yellow Kid Cap Bomb for another interpretation in iron. However, I have no idea what the thing sticking out of his head is. How big is it? How about a pic...
  9. The Frost Cutlery website states that Jim Frost began "importing" knives with the Frost stamping in 1978. While they make a big deal out of owning Hen & Rooster, formerly a premium quality cutlery com...
  10. Ah, yes, my bad - Daddy_Nobucks is right - I didn't look closely enough at the lettering. That kind of semantic error-in-translation is common though, and is one of the clues we can use when evaluatin...
  11. Frost is a relatively recent company, ca. 1990s. I doubt that Coke was still giving away knives at that time. Also, notice that it say's "bottle" rather then "bottles." That is an Oriental construction.
  12. Lotsa "grab hooks" on Google and they all look like . . . wait for it . . . Hooks! Nothing like this one with turned-out ends.
  13. Definitely European - the antler is from a red deer. This specific shape of blade/handle is commonly produced in Germany although I have never seen one quite this fancy with a bust attached. The blade...
  14. ebay# 142598684237
  15. This is a lighting device. You are missing several parts at the bottom including the glass globe.
  16. Auto body smoothing rasp from back when they used lead to fill in small irregularities left over from hammering out dents. (pre-Bondo, pre- just replace the whole fender)
  17. Part of a balance scale. Unfortunately you are missing the beam and pans (and weights).
  18. The socket end would attach to a long pole. It's a pig catcher. It snaps over a hind leg and causes bacon.
  19. The handle appears to be a ball foot from a table or stool. The ball can be glass and still have a seam.
  20. The two pointed pins suggest that it was intended to be "attached" only temporarily and then removed for re-use. For example: it could have been pushed into a bundle of something and a cord wrapped ar...
  21. This is called a "screw key" lock. Inside the body is the bolt, which passes through a hole in the shackle, at its end opposite the hinge. A spring holds the bolt in the "locked" position in the shack...
  22. These knives are tourist souvenirs made in India during the 1950s & 1960s. They can sometimes be found with double-ended sheaths having a knife & fork at opposite ends and intended as carving sets. Th...
  23. This falls into the category of "quill" knife - a knife with very small blade(s) used to cut a "nib" in the end of a quill feather to make a writing pen. It is unnecessarily elaborate and beautifully ...
  24. It is part of a wall-mounted, indoor, clothes drying rack. There would have been a 18"+/- wooden bar mounted on each of the rivets in the cast iron head. There was a provision for them to all hang dow...
  25. Technically this is a charcoal iron, not a sad iron. A sad iron is a solid block of metal heated on a specially made burner or on a stove top. With this iron you put burning coals, from a stove or fur...
  26. It is an atomizer. It can be used to spray a mist of any thin liquid: lubricant, disinfectant, perfume, etc.
  27. From India or thereabouts.
  28. I'm reasonably certain that the blade is made from an industrial hacksaw blade.
  29. It appears to be a simple rug hooking needle.
  30. The sound, "like a harmonica" (i.e. a metal reed), it is probably the key of "A" - the pitch you tune the first string of a violin to. In other words, its a violinist's novelty pitch pipe. Very cool!
  31. definitely a trivet for a sad iron.
  32. The cover on your lock appears to be marked "V&R Blakemore / Birmingham (England)." Blakemore was an agent, sometime around WWI, possibly later, who seems to have specialized in procuring hardware, lo...
  33. When the pieces are assembled, roughly what is the length of the whole tool?
  34. You can scrape gently on the tang area, with another knife, to remove rust. Some tang stamps are so shallow that any dirt obscures them and any actual rust pitting destroys them. I suspect the knife ...
  35. You have a "sleeveboard" jack knife; given its size some would call it a jumbo sleeveboard. The name refers to its silhouette which looks like the small ironing boards folks used to use to iron shirt ...
  36. If the blade is 6" long it is 1962 or earlier; 5" is post-1962. After Viet Nam a ton of never-issued examples were sold as surplus. An as-new knife with sheath and stone can be bought for $50+/-.
  37. This is a souvenir knife from some Spanish speaking place. On one side it is resist-etched "Recuerdo" which means "memory" (as in "a remembrance of") and on the other is "Adios Mariq(uina)?"" which co...
  38. It's missing a part. There should be a metal bar, split lengthwise, with a row of differently sized holes, that the cone-shaped piece is forced into to flare out the end of the tube.
  39. And the two sliding pieces with the points in them are called Trammel Points.
  40. I think this might be a kitchen gadget given as a premium by Rand Lumber. Many old cooking/baking pans were thin, formed, sheet iron with slightly beveled sides. The angle of the jaws on this piece wo...
  41. Vom Cleff & Co. was a New York City importer (1885-1926) at 105 Duane St. who imported razors and other cutting tools from Germany and England.
  42. Great work, lzenglish!
  43. Good luck! When you hear from them you may want to re-post the item.
  44. I think that when you find out what this is it will be a proprietary tool for some kind of measurement/adjustment on a Beliot paper machine and it has no other use. That's why we can't figure it out. ...
  45. MDR- I was thinking that too, although it does appear to be a self-contained tool. The company has a lot of patents but none that I found were remotely like this.
  46. I think the small scale on the brass piece is some kind of Vernier scale to give a more accurate reading than what can be read off the moveable scale alone. The little brass part screwed to the arc wo...
  47. bb2 - exposed balls and a deviate compass! What is the world coming to?
  48. Very loosely: in the late 19th century, when that style of binnacle was developed, a ship would be have been fairly large before it required a binnacle - let's say 125 feet or more - i.e. ocean-going....
  49. Google "Model Binnacle" https://www.google.com/search?q=model+binnacle&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi7sIaX-K_WAhWD4SYKHUkJDQYQsAQIRA&biw=1024&bih=638
  50. The general shape suggests it may be a key for a Wootens Patent railroad lock. If you can find the remains of an approximately 3/8" long iron tab inserted into the fat portion of the shank, that will ...
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