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Three Souvenir Knives From Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary) Having Stone Mosaic Handles – ca. 1900 - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Primitive "Free-Bolt" Screw-Key P-Lock - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Early 19th Century Heckle for "Anything Obscure" - goes with your flax breaker - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
59 Year Old Wedding Cake in a Can - Mmmmmm! - Kitchenin Kitchen
What are these things? And the mystery is solved! - Asianin Asian
For Bigship_Iron - A typical Horseman's knife. - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Japanese Metal Applique Button or Glove Hook - Accessoriesin Accessories
Antique Ambidextrous Scissors - 1881 - Sewingin Sewing
Odd Handtool Marked Park-Aid - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware
Convert your Circular Saw to a Chainsaw! - Tools and Hardwarein Tools and Hardware

Comments

  1. The name is Voos. & yes, they are poultry shears. They were part of a boxed carving set with a carving knife, steel, & fork. The handle tangs are simply pressed into holes bored into the stag pieces. ...
  2. It appears to be a cutter to make a decorative zig-zag edge on a piece of leather. It would be struck with a mallet.
  3. Elosi. ca. 1930. This is a trademark of Ernest Lohr & Otto Stiehl, of Germany, who patented the handle construction technique consisting of wrapping a thin layer of plastic around two hollow metal she...
  4. It wouldn't hold a very thick roll of TP either. It MIGHT be (if it has been bent in toward the mounting surface) a curtain hold-back. The bar would be mounted horizontally.
  5. It is a "saw set." There are countless variations.
  6. Definitely a style of knife FROM the Philippines but not from Japan. A human face on the handle is not typical of these knives and may have been done by a GI.
  7. It is unfortunate that the blade is pitted but it's a good-looking, if not terribly valuable, knife and is still worth more to a serious collector with the pitting than if the blade were to be re-sur...
  8. Unless you plan to use these knives they do NOT need to be sharpened. They should be rubbed with a lightly oiled cloth, dried off, and left as-is.
  9. This type of "peacock" knife handle (commonly found on folding knives as well as other small household implements) is a specialty of the city of Jezzine in Lebanon. "INOX" is European for inoxidable, ...
  10. Ok, I'll give you that one.
  11. This type of work, where the surface is pounded down leaving the design raised, is typically Persian. I have a lamp almost exactly identical to this except that there is a snake weaving its way up and...
  12. Yes, toe rings, no, elephant spurs. The extension fit under the adjacent toes to prevent the ring from rotating since it is decidedly top heavy. From a province in the northwest of India, the name of ...
  13. Oy vey. First - the inscription on the blade is Soy la Fuerza, not puerza, so the translation is, from Spanish, "I am the Force" (which makes a lot more sense on a knife than "purity.") Second it's on...
  14. I too, thought it was small. That size negates all my guesses. Wow! It could be an architectural panel from a fancy railroad car, elevator, or anywhere inside a ritzy building.
  15. Most likely held a flower planter bowl/pot.
  16. You don't give the size. It looks like it could be a cover for a theater or hotel hallway "night" light, or even installed in a stair riser in a movie house - any place where only a minimal amount of ...
  17. These things would make an interesting collection & display. There are so many different designs and they are not expensive.
  18. It looks as though it may one of the approximately ten thousand variations on a Saw Set.
  19. According to one specialist website Sussex Armoury was in business between the "late 1970s and the early 1990s." It cost about 4.99 British Pounds , or about $6.50. At that time the Buck knife it is c...
  20. I agree with AnythingObscure. The cut in the handle for a "blade" to rest in does not go all the way through; that is typical of bevel gauges. Also, I have seen cast iron "pistol-grip" handles with pr...
  21. It's on the "high-average" side of size (I own the largest one I have ever seen, which is 5" long w/o the key; also the smallest one at 7/8", which I made). These are easier for a competant blacks...
  22. George Schrade Knife Co 1929-1958. Your knife is from late in the period. Not to be confused with the Schrade Cutlery Co. (Walden NY), also founded by Geo. Schrade. George Schrade was a force to recko...
  23. The R-arrow mark is from the J. Russell Co. which made pocket knives from 1875 thru 1941 (also, you can just see the "R" and the "LL" on the tang. This pattern is a type of jack knife called a "Barlo...
  24. This particular shape is also known as a "P" lock.
  25. This is a modern (maybe 1970s-1980s) knock-off of a knife design, the Folding Safety Hunter, first offered by the Marbles Safety Axe Co. of Gladstone Michigan in 1902. Of course, the Marbles knife is ...
  26. This is a glass tubing cutter for use with boiler sight-glass tubes, etc. The cutting wheel is at the end of the rod with the scale on it and goes inside the tube to the desired depth set on the depth...
  27. The pattern name for this knife (its handle shape and blade set-up) is called a "premium stock knife." The stock pattern was developed for ranchers and the blade at the single-blade end is called a "s...
  28. This is an interesting variation on a fairly common, usually all-metal, folding knife which normally carries a friction-fit (i.e. the pencil is retained by friction without the "locking tabs") mechani...
  29. I've been using it for that Collectibles59, but it isn't very effective. The tines are not arced enough to do a good job
  30. By the way: Many jurisdictions consider these knives to be "switchblades." Know your laws (see KnifeRights.org) before carrying or showing it around.
  31. Most of the older butterfly knives encountered (the hand-made-looking ones) are from the Philippines. They were a favorite WWII GI souvenir from that area of the world. This type of knife can easily b...
  32. I think Alemite Zerk is a character in one of the Star Wars movies. He worked for a pusher named En-Y'ma Sir Ringe. They were a couple of greasy guys.
  33. This is one of the things that the US ordered and bought from Japan after the war to help re-build their manufacturing infrastructure. Your knife is, I believe, the largest of a line of similarly cons...
  34. That eagle-head pommel design and the one-piece, cast-in-place, brass handle are typically Mexican features. Whether it was a "serious" knife, or just intended as a decorative wall-hanger, I can't te...
  35. This is a Puukko - the traditional general purpose outdoor knife of Finland. The handle is made of stacked and compressed birch bark.
  36. The USA mark is by Colonial Knife Co. (not Colonial Cutlery Co.) - 1926 thru ca. 2000. The way you can tell is if you examine the bolsters carefully you will see that they are not individual, solid p...
  37. Agree with lzenglish. Start with butcher's knives.
  38. Generic Mediterranean area dagger, from Spain. The macho engravings say "Live (the life of) the man of honor" & "the traitors (will) die" which is sort of like saying "the honorable man will kill the ...
  39. Interesting site. It does show a lot of Talwar swords and it also shows a link to your exact blade & scabbard identified as "A vintage Indian Talwar sword with . . . the disk pommel characteristic of...
  40. It is some kind of bayonet from Spain. (Toledo is a cutlery manufacturing center in Spain, as Sheffield is in England, for example.) Go to Google and type in "artilleria bayonet."
  41. This appears to be a "punal" or Argentinian gaucho's knife.
  42. It can't be a plumb bob because there is no way to attach a string. It MIGHT be a "plumber's turnip" for flaring lead pipe, although it is much bigger than they usually are.
  43. If it was "real" it wouldn't have a teeny little tang like that which appears to have been simply glued into the handle.
  44. You are correct Onedetent. It is definitely not a de-horner. They are built similarly but they have sharp blades like a robust tree pruner or a guillotine sort of tool. I think someone wrote that he h...
  45. It is definitely an old muzzle-loading shotgun. That is an old European-style stock treatment and you can see the trigger and the percussion lock on the stock. He is loading it with a ramrod. He is a ...
  46. OK. What part hooks onto the bailing wire and after it's pulled tighter how is the tension maintained?
  47. The one with the large, flat flag is for a watchman's time station. As he makes his rounds he must insert a numbered key, chained to a specific location, into his clock at specific times. The number &...
  48. Interesting! How about some additional pictures illustrating what you're talking about (i.e. how it works). It appears to have some kind of mounting plate at the bottom? What does the back look like?
  49. OK. First that's not verdigris. Verdigris (from the French "vert de Grece" or "the green of Greece") is a blue/green oxide of copper which forms on brass. Second, cleaning an antique with Brasso, or a...
  50. I agree with blunderbuss2. It looks like a heavy-duty "hollow auger" with the advantage that there is no maximum length to the area to be reduced - you just keep moving it down the stock, making a dow...
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