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Door Knobs13 of 47Old French and solid wood stained doors from 1925Branford Lock works collection
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    Posted 3 years ago

    Sherriexanne
    (5 items)

    Any information please contact me at my email: sheriexanne3@gmail.com randomly found, very heavy, possibly entirely brass piece

    Unsolved Mystery

    Help us close this case. Add your knowledge below.

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    Comments

    1. AnythingObscure AnythingObscure, 3 years ago
      Yes, a lockset/knobs for a door, likely what'd be called "eastlake style' I believe, ca. late 1800's-early 1900's.
    2. Watchsearcher Watchsearcher, 3 years ago
      This is called a “Rim lock”.
      The square metal part is screwed to the surface of the door from which you want to lock it. For instance, you would put it on the inside of the bathroom door.
      There is a small lever to lock/unlock the door from the inside. There is a key hole extending thru the door to the outside so you can lock/unlock it from the outside.
    3. Sherriexanne, 3 years ago
      Thank you. Someone painted it on one side any suggestions of restoration without messing up the finish time has put on it?
    4. Sherriexanne, 3 years ago
      It also has #'s on the one side beneath the knob, says MW44...something, why?
    5. Watchsearcher Watchsearcher, 3 years ago
      I have a rim lock on a door in my house so I looked to see if there were numbers. I don’t see any - possibly there could be in the inside of it but I don’t want to remove it to check.
      I’m guessing the numbers may correspond to a key shape.
      “Back in the day” of these and some other locks, skeleton keys were commonly used.
      I suggest trying to locate a skeleton key to see it it would work. Maybe if you took your entire lock set to an antique store, some nice helpful proprietor will let you try some of their skeleton keys to see it they will work.

      But even without a key, you can still use the rim lock. I have mine on my bathroom door and I don’t want anybody to be able to unlock it from the other side anyway! I never cut a key hole in the door or bought a key.


      To remove paint, I would try this first: I discovered, quite by accident, that Spic and Span cleaner will remove paint from metal.

      In cleaning my range hood, I wiped Spin and Span on it with a sponge and within 2 or 3 swipes, I was seeing metal! I was horrified. I went from just cleaning the kitchen to having to go buy enamel paint and repaint the hood.
      Then a few years later, another mistake: I was prepping my back door to paint it and wanted it nice and clean—I sprayed on Spin and Span, waited a minute or two to wipe it off and realized the paint was wrinkled/detaching. So then it dawned on me that it is a metal door! I had to scrape the loose paint off with razor blades before I could finally get to paint.

      The black paint on your lock is the original finish so leave that alone.
      If you choose to try my Spin and Span technique, just dab it on the white paint that needs to be removed but do not let it run into the black paint unless you want to repaint the whole thing.
      Leave you door knob as is....it’s finish is worn and beautiful from decades of handling!

      I hope all this helps you! :-)

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