Share your favorites on Show & Tell

Gift to the Family of those who have paid the ultimate price

In Military and Wartime > World War One > Show & Tell and Posters and Prints > Etchings > Show & Tell.
Dr_Rambow's loves43 of 131Big Big BrassCompany L, 15th Minn. N.G. as Ship Builders
13
Love it
1
Like it

JohnsmithJohnsmith loves this.
bucketheadbuckethead loves this.
dlpetersendlpetersen loves this.
aghcollectaghcollect loves this.
ManikinManikin loves this.
AmberRoseAmberRose loves this.
valentino97valentino97 loves this.
chinabluechinablue loves this.
walksoftlywalksoftly loves this.
miKKoChristmas11miKKoChristmas11 loves this.
HunterHunter loves this.
Dr_RambowDr_Rambow loves this.
tlmbarantlmbaran loves this.
scottvezscottvez likes this.
See 12 more
Add to collection

    Please create an account, or Log in here

    If you don't have an account, create one here.


    Create a Show & TellReport as inappropriate


    Posted 9 years ago

    Hardbrake
    (35 items)

    This beautiful Pen and Ink was a gift to the families of the United States service members, whom left for Europe, from cites, towns and farms, in 1918 never to return. Most were in their late teens or early 20's, as was Claude Dallas Fleming, my great uncle. From Maitland, Missouri, he joined the U.S. Army (National Guard) in the search for Poncho Villa. Never having been discharged from the National Guard, he was returned to active duty, at the start of World War I. Claude Fleming would parish on September 27, 1918, on one of the many battle fields of France, at the age of 23. He like many American service men at the time, was unmarried but was from a large family having 7 brothers and 2 sisters. Glades Fleming his sister received this as their mother had passed away from the Spanish flu in 1918. My Grandmother left this rolled up stored in a trunk for over 75 years, as she could not stop crying every time she looked at it. There must be hundreds of these "gifts" somewhere in storage or on display in American. No one is alive who served personality in the Great War but a few who knew these fine Americans, are still with us. The service men who gave their life can still be remember not only on one 1 special day but when ever we can. This Award is framed and hung in my home next to an American Flag which also flew over the battlefield where Claude Fleming gave his all. I have seen a couple of these Pen an Inks, for sale in different Antique and Military shops. If you see one stop and read who it names appears as having given his all, ever if you not going to buy it. You can take his name with you for free, I do. Hardbrake

    logo
    World War One
    See all
    Barbed Wire WWI germany original WW1 dug barb battle relic vintage Great War
    Barbed Wire WWI germany original WW...
    $14
    WW1 BRITISH ARMY HELMET & LINER. COMPLETE. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
    WW1 BRITISH ARMY HELMET & LINER. CO...
    $295
    Great original US ww1 bayonet m1917 Remington p14 rifle shotgun
    Great original US ww1 bayonet m1917...
    $92
    Original WW1 German Leather Prussian Shako Helmet M1915 WWI
    Original WW1 German Leather Prussia...
    $290
    logo
    Barbed Wire WWI germany original WW1 dug barb battle relic vintage Great War
    Barbed Wire WWI germany original WW...
    $14
    See all

    Comments

    1. scottvez scottvez, 9 years ago
      Nice Memorial Weekend posting!

      Scott
    2. miKKoChristmas11 miKKoChristmas11, 9 years ago
      A very fine remembrance of a noble sacrifice. Beautiful.
    3. chinablue chinablue, 9 years ago
      Beautiful and sobering reminder of the true cost of war. Thanks for sharing this item and the story.
    4. scottvez scottvez, 9 years ago
      These are known as "Columbia Accolades".

      scott
    5. valentino97 valentino97, 9 years ago
      Thanks for sharing this memory. It is very special.

      My grandmother's brother ran off to war when he was 17 and then died in 1918 of influenza in France before he saw any action. His parents were devastated - mostly because he ran away - and obviously! because he was just a boy. His insurance money was kept in a bag (his mother would not look at it either) but when her only daughter (my grandmother) got engaged in 1930 - she took the money and bought a diamond ring. In 1930 at the beginning of the depression that money could have bought a lot of comfort and security, but she decided to trade her sorrow for a loving gift.
    6. valentino97 valentino97, 9 years ago
      If you would like to see a picture of my grandmother - look at my collection "porcelain ring". She was gorgeous!
    7. Hardbrake Hardbrake, 9 years ago
      Touching story (sad) and yes I will visit your listing, thank you Hardbrake

    Want to post a comment?

    Create an account or login in order to post a comment.