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Day Brothers Post Drill

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    Posted 4 years ago

    lellon123
    (1 item)

    I have obtained an antique drill. Looking for more information on it. It is stamped "Day Brothers" and appears to have been made in Philly, PA. There is a model 25 on it. Any help is much appreciated, thanks

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    Comments

    1. fhrjr2 fhrjr2, 4 years ago
      Not a drill, what you have is an old wood working lathe. The face plate speaks for it being a wood lathe as opposed to a metal working lathe.
    2. Padit, 4 years ago
      What I can find about this item is that is meant to mount vertically on a wall and likewise used in that manner. I know not whether it is for wood or metal, but it is referred by the company as a "post driller" and as someone that was a machine operator in my early years, some of the adjustment parts look to me to be redundant in use. The round with slots part, I feel would be for mounting a holding fixture for the part that is being manufactured.
    3. fhrjr2 fhrjr2, 4 years ago
      You certainly have my interest in this item. Learning as I go. I found these but by a different company. They were listed as a Pillar Drill and Bearing Press. Thus far all of them I have found like this were made around 1918 time period.
    4. Padit, 4 years ago
      fhrjr2:
      This is the information I have on the Day Bros. Company and the piece of machinery in this post. As I read about this Co., They likely had some things in stock for Blacksmith company's that could be purchased outright or you could order an item such as the one in this posting and they would manufacture it for you. Sounds as though, as I read it, they had all the plans/prints/drawings that the could use to forge the parts needed themselves.(roll down on the screen) Not a bad idea as it looks to have been in atleast the mid 19th century. Working in machine shops teaches you quite abit about ratios of gearing versus the speed of the tool used.
    5. Padit, 4 years ago
      fhrjr2: I forgot to add this to the last post.
      http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgIndex/detail.aspx?id=3378
      http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/3378/4678.pdf
    6. fhrjr2 fhrjr2, 4 years ago
      Padit
      Working in the shops will give you an education if you are willing to learn. Years ago I worked nights running WWII vintage six spindle screw machines making bearings for patriot missiles.
    7. Padit, 4 years ago
      fhrjr2:
      Yes, I had my time at automatic screw machines myself. I operated them in the early sixties and a spell in the late sixties. The first shop was not a large shop and the owner that hired me offered me lessons on making the cams for them. As it was not my intention to make this my trade due for one I was tired of smelling like sulfur cutting oil, although they did start using the water soluble type oil later. Once the machines were set up, the rest was checking it and installing more stock when it ran out. I was fortunate to have the training I got, as they had many other types of machinery that I learned how to set up and use it in other shops. Looking back, I really liked it.
    8. keeno55 keeno55, 4 years ago
      My grandpa had one just like this. It is a hand operated drill press. Played with his all the time!

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