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Polish P-64 service pistol

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    Posted 10 months ago

    kwqd
    (708 items)

    The P-64 is a Polish semi-automatic service pistol which fires the 9×18mm Makarov cartridge. The pistol was designed and developed in the late 1950s at the Institute for Artillery Research (Polish: Zak?ad Broni Strzeleckiej Centralnego Badawczego Poligonu Artyleryjskiego, later the Military Institute of Armament Technology, Polish: Wojskowy Instytut Techniczny Uzbrojenia w Zielonce—WITU). The design team consisted of W. Czepukajtis, R. Zimny, H. Adamczyk, M. Adamczyk, S. Kaczmarski and J. Pyzel. The P-64 is also known as the CZAK which is an acronym of the designers' last names except for J. Pyzel, who joined the team after the name had been established.

    The P-64 is a double-action blowback-operated pistol with a spring extractor mounted in the slide. The rotating slide catch, in the pistol's frame, contains a protrusion which acts as an empty case ejector. The pistol's trigger mechanism includes a disconnector which prevents automatic fire. It has a double-action trigger which allows the pistol to be both cocked and fired with one pull of the trigger. It has an exposed hammer, rounded or pointed, depending when the pistol was manufactured. The slide has a loaded chamber indicator above the hammer which, both visually and by feel, indicates the presence of a round in the chamber. A manual safety lever that prevents the weapon from being accidentally discharged when the hammer is either cocked or released. This allows a round to be chambered with the safety engaged or disengaged. In the "safe" position, the firing pin is locked and the trigger bar is disconnected from the hammer notch. If the hammer is cocked and the safety is engaged, the safety will release the hammer. In 1973 the trigger mechanism was modified and the hammer was changed to a triangular shape, designed for easier cocking with the thumb.

    The P-64 is fed from a 6-round single-stack box magazine. After the last round has been fired, the magazine follower lifts the slide catch, which locks the slide open. The slide can then be released by withdrawing the magazine a short distance and pulling the slide back. The pistol has a fixed front sight, and a dovetailed rear sight with a square notch. The sights are calibrated for firing at 50 m. The all-steel P-64 is manufactured mainly by machine cutting. It is issued with a spare magazine, a leather holster, and a cleaning kit.

    It is about 6.3 " (160 mm) long x 4.6" (84.6) high x 1" (2.54 cm)thick and weighs 22 ounces (620 gm).

    Though fairly heavy due to its all steel construction, the recoil is sharp due to its blow back design and small size. This pistol has been a popular concealed carry choice since it was first imported into the U.S. It is a bit heavy for use as a pocket pistol. A common modification is to add custom grips to moderate the felt recoil. It is a handy little pistol if you have small to medium sized hands. The protrusion on the magazine acts as a rest for your little finger if your hands are not too large. Folks with large hands sometimes experience "slide bite" on the web of their hand during firing.

    The P-64 was replaced as the service pistol of the Polish military and police in 1983 by the P-83, in the same caliber, but the P-64 continued in use for several years and is still in use to a limited extent. The manufacturing and finishing process made the P-64 too expensive to produce. It is very finely made and finished pistol.

    More information at:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FB_P-64

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ34i3NYWL0

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    Comments

    1. welzebub, 10 months ago
      I am curious as to the dimensions and weight. Interesting firearm.
    2. kwqd kwqd, 10 months ago
      It is about 6.3 " (160 mm) long x 4.6" (84.6) high x 1" (2.54 cm)thick and weighs 22 ounces (620 gm).
    3. kwqd kwqd, 10 months ago
      It is a handy little pistol if you have small to medium sized hands. The protrusion on the magazine acts as a rest for your little finger if your hands are not too large. Folks with large hands sometimes experience "slide bite" on the web of their hand during firing.
    4. welzebub, 10 months ago
      Thanks for the info. Great little pistol. My handguns are revolvers, a 38 special and a 45. No slide bite. :-)
    5. kwqd kwqd, 10 months ago
      YW! I love revolvers, but I am left handed, so they are more for fun shooting, not serious shooting for me. I am down to one from maybe a dozen. I will soon be doing a post for the P-83 which replaced the P-64 as the Polish service pistol.
    6. kwqd kwqd, 10 months ago
      Added a link to one of the more popular YouTube videos on this pistol.
    7. kwqd kwqd, 10 months ago
      Thanks for taking time to look at my P-64 pistol post Chevelleman69, Longings, Thomas, officialfuel, fortapache, Jenni and welzebub!
    8. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 10 months ago
      Obviously you too have put quite a few quid into older fine weapons. I have a better feel for them. They are basic functional guns ! Guns are just like everything else mechanical. The more you add, the more that can go wrong. For belt, you just can't really beat the Browning HP. For concealed, the Walther PP is hard to beat, though looked on as antiquated. There are many fine older pistols that will fill both categories. It must have an exposed hammer though.
    9. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 10 months ago
      I worry more about other people with hammer-less guns. Majority don't know "sh*t" about what they hold & the irrevocable damage they can cause. The majority of those don't know if a squeeze on the trigger will make a bang or not. They & their guns scare me. At least, with a hammer, you know if it's cocked and that gives (me) a better opinion if it has one in the chamber. I've tried carrying hammer-less and just don't trust them, even with my experience. You can see a hammer or feel it with your thumb. Hammer-less, you are just going by memory or guessing. Hey, just my opinion !
    10. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 10 months ago
      Both of these that you have posted appear to have a take-down like the Walther PP/PPK. Right ?
    11. kwqd kwqd, 10 months ago
      On the P64 you pull the trigger guard down and move it to rest on the frame. On the P83 there are is a tab on the frame inside the trigger guard that you pull down. Then both are the same as a Walther, pull the slide back and up off the frame.
    12. kwqd kwqd, 9 months ago
      @blunderbuss2 - Seeing the hammer makes me more comfortable, too, especially since many of the popular carry pistols no longer have a visible safety switch. It makes trigger discipline critical.

      Thanks for taking a look at my P-64 pistol bobby725, yougottahavestuff, blunderbuss2 and vintagegirl66!
    13. TexasJack TexasJack, 9 months ago
      https://www.google.com/search?q=polish+p+64+service+pistol+for+sale&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=23JGnrVRpzeOiM%253A%252CtYMIK-iz312LRM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRMCo_D6fOYx6coZwZ3QeVKzNr3yg&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwif7-_uh-voAhVImeAKHe4pAe0Q9QEwD3oECAkQFQ#imgrc=0fakraqWjBNS3M&imgdii=ZiicIR5NckOXBM
    14. kwqd kwqd, 9 months ago
      Getting harder to find these for sale, TexasJack. A couple of years ago most on line surplus sites had them. Now you have to go to on line auction sites like GunBroker.com to find them.

      Thanks for taking time to look at my P-64 post TexasJack and sanhardin!
    15. kwqd kwqd, 9 months ago
      The ones at CenterfireSystems are deactivated (not shootable) for training purposes, only. Most shops are out of stock. I paid $180-$200 for mine with holster, cleaning rod and one extra magazine. A few years before that you could find them for $100-$150 with accessories. Now they usually start at about $300 and up. Still possible to find them for slightly less if you shop around. That won't last much longer. I think about 90,000 of these were made.
    16. kwqd kwqd, 9 months ago
      Thank you Daisy1000!

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