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  1. Probably intended for a cricket to be kept as a pet.
  2. Your mark falls in a group called 'Brown ground etched base marks. Click on the link, scroll down to 'Brown Incised Marks', examine that one, then click on the blue "Continue to section' for more. I t...
  3. Click on this link: http://www.gotheborg.com/marks/20thcenturychina.shtml Then scroll down to this, nearly at the bottom: Zhongguo Jingdezhen Zhi - China Jingdezhen made (Right to Left) Then c...
  4. Not Satsuma. Rotate the mark 90 degrees clockwise. Right stack reads Kutani. Left stack probably kiln, possibly artist. Not in Gotheborg Kutani, my lists, or other references. I think your date asse...
  5. Well thank you Karen (apologies if that's not right). You and Katherine reply to more of my comments than the posters, and it keeps me from getting lonely. The red one a post over is the same material...
  6. He is neither carved nor bone. He is lost wax molded catalytic resin/ composition, made using principles from the book behind him. The color is not patina, but dye added to the resin, and the base is...
  7. The lead warning stamp tells you that it was made after 1980
  8. It could go either way, it's a tad large for saki, and the tokurri typically do not have lids, but there are so many out there, some probably do. My bet is on tea, and a missing cup
  9. The mark on this porcelain bowl, rotated 90 degrees counter clockwise reads left to right Zhongguo Longquan: 'China Made Longquan' referring to the Celadon type glaze made famous by the Longquan kil...
  10. The right stack in the square reads 'Dai Nichi Hon', Great Japan. The left stack is likely the kiln and the marks in the oval the artist. The bottom mark in the oval may be an unusual form of Zan or Y...
  11. The mark on the base is for the Qianlong reign (1736 - 1795) ib the Qing dynasty, but the vase was made at Jingdezhen after 1950, or is a copy of such. My vote is for Jingdezhen.
  12. Wow TA, I hope this gets a deserved 'Solved' status. So, not ink blocks, but Thai amulets. Completely new to me and good on you.
  13. The only thing that comes to mind is ink blocks. usually decorated black, but sometimes in various colors. as yours. Here are some with more information: http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/18681...
  14. Very nice. It may be a brush washer. No marks on base?
  15. The symbol reads 'Happiness'.
  16. Nicest item to show up here in a while, speaks of some serious age and use. I don't see indications of bone (striations) or ivory (fine grain patterns called Schreger lines), but they are sometimes di...
  17. Dave is correct The mark Seizan is also found in the typical Satsuma red and gold, but both marks without the Shimazu mon, cross in circle, denoting Satsuma. The decoration is that of the Japanese G...
  18. The red stamp, rotated 90 degrees counter clockwise, reads top down and right to left: Great Qing, Qianlong, Period Make. The Qianlong reign in the Qing dynasty lasted from 1736 to 1795. This porcela...
  19. Rotate the second photo 180 degrees for correct orientation. I have this mark as Post Chinese Cultural Revolution and date it after 1977.
  20. Wow Dave! Impressive resolution.
  21. I have this print with the same frame and from about 1975. The translation is from my cousin who taught conversational English for businessmen in Japan for about four years.
  22. The first character after 98 is 'China' and the next probably reads 'Made' or 'Make' but is not in the usual form for that.
  23. I have the Japanese four character translation for the third photo as 'Watching Fish in a Pond'. Produced in the last half of the 20th century with identical 18 x 22 inch gold frames, total productio...
  24. The mark is 'three' in Chinese and Japanese, and in Japan is read as San. I don't believe you would find it representing a kiln in references for either country. The technique of applied raised porce...
  25. I like it more than any of my smaller collection described above.
  26. Not a dragon. This is a mythical Kirin, hooves, backward raking horns, scales, and hair tail. Found on Japanese beer labels of the same name, samurai tachi (swords) and elsewhere. It is not possible...
  27. Where in the world are you, it's 98 F. here in the middle of Texas. Send me some chilly!
  28. The mark, rotated 45 degrees clockwise, is a four character Qianlong reign (1736 to 1795) in the Qing dynasty and very popular on reproduction porcelain. Probably late 20th century or later.
  29. The fourth photo is out of focus, when downloaded it cannot be enhanced enough to to be read. The pieces in the square don't look familiar, but with a sharp image, who knows?
  30. Hi Racer, thank you for the PR!
  31. The figure is the Asian goddess of mercy, with many names. Quan Yin, Guanyin, and more in China, Kannon in Japan. She is the most popular female figure in the Asian pantheon. Dave is correct, she is ...
  32. The symbol in the second photo, rotated upright, is that of the Chinese Star God Shou and longevity.
  33. The mark if Kutani, and from the style I would date if from 1950 to 1960. Could be later.
  34. In the first and second photos, the two larger mythical beasts are Kirin, sometimes shown more horse-like. They have hooves, scales instead of hair and backward flowing horns, with a hair tail. A sli...
  35. Thank you Kyra.
  36. The mark on your modern bronze censer, rotated 90 degrees clockwise, reads top down and right to left: Great Ming, Xuande, Period Made. Xuande was the fifth reign, 1426 to 1435.
  37. Your Star Gods were definitely made in the same shop as my figures with no work being done in China or Japan. The few pieces that I have been able to attribute to Asian manufacture have nowhere near t...
  38. Your very well done Star Gods are lost wax molded resin or composition, likely made in Italy. I have been collecting this molded Asian art since 1970, and some of it dates to around 1920, but not th...
  39. I have seen similar, not identical, vases and jars attributed to Hong Kong. This one may have had a rounded lid at one time, a la ginger jars. The decoration, also characteristic of Hong Kong, is in i...
  40. Hi Ho2, most of these figures only show very light grain under high intensity light and good magnification. It's next to impossible to pick up with a camera. Most of them seem to have been dyed, pro...
  41. The mark on the bottom, rotated 135 degrees counter clockqise is for the Qianlong reign (1736 to 1795) in the Qing dynasty. But the bowl is modern and based on decoration was made at Jingdezhen afte...
  42. Most likely sake.
  43. Otagiri Mercantile Company, many unusual modern and interesting designs, always very well done.
  44. Sklo nailed it, and you don't see a lot of demure these days.
  45. Hi Eric, please delete my Comment 1, which is in error. Your plate is Japanese, and the mark reads Marumi Gama Kinsei , which is interpreted as 'Humbly made at Round Beauty Kiln'.
  46. Hi Katherine, didn't know I was gone, didn't mean to be, but I'm glad I'm back. Thanks for missing me.
  47. Good for you Efes, thanks a bunch.
  48. The mark is that of the Qianlong (1736 to 1795) reign in the Qing dynasty, very popular on reproduction porcelain. Dave is right on with the age.
  49. The auction results and ring you are showing is in eBay format. There are no current returns for 77pudd. Ring is cast, not carved, and the casting quality is poor. I can think of no legitimate e...
  50. Hi Rosie, the only explanation I have for the 'happy face' is that it's Okame, the character mask of the Goddess of Mirth from Japanese Noh theater. But why it might be an embellishment on Chinese rob...
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