CanyonRoad

Collections

CanyonRoad has not created any collections yet. What are collections?

Comments

  1. Sorry, this isn't Navajo or Native American. It's a kilim, from the Middle East. Navajo rugs are never woven with fringe on the ends, as it is impossible to do so on a Navajo loom. They also use ...
  2. No, not Native American, since it has fringe on both ends and uses a split stitch technique...neither of which is ever found on NA rugs. Sorry I can't tell you what it is, only what it isn't....
  3. It appears to be incised pottery. The colors and style of patterns in the bands around the rim look like contemporary Chorotega pottery from Costa Rica. ( See: http://www.bluecoyotegallery.com/Co...
  4. The pot is American raku, and therefore is decorative only, not meant to be used as a vase (unless for artificial or dried flowers), since it is not waterproof. Since tens of thousands of studio ...
  5. It looks like you got lucky here. Generally it's not a good idea to buy Native American items unless one has a fairly good background in the area, since so many fakes and "look alikes" are on the mar...
  6. Yes. The Otavalo Market is a main outlet for this style of pottery.
  7. Actually, it's from Ecuador.
  8. I agree! I just don't type fast enough....
  9. It appears to be an antique betel nut cutter, part of the paraphernalia used in chewing betel nut (areca nut), a popular practice in Southeast and South Asia. Probably from Indian or Indonesia.
  10. It's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria and neighboring Niger.
  11. I forgot to mention that Popovi was not her oldest son. That was Adam, followed by John, then Popovi, and her youngest son, Philip.
  12. Sorry, but this is not the work or signature of Joy Navasie. "Frog Woman" (and it's two words, not one) is an inherited title. The first Frog Woman was Paqua Naha. Her daughter, Joy Navasie, was ...
  13. Reycita Naranjo, active 1940-2000. Is that size right? A little over an inch tall?
  14. That would be August, 1966.
  15. The numbers represent the month and day the pot was completed.
  16. If it has a date or number under the "Popovi," it was done 1959-1971.
  17. No, it's from Indonesia. Not really tribal art, it's made strictly for the tourist market, and isn't based on any traditional tribal art. Just has the "look" tourists think is associated with Indone...
  18. Yes, it's Acoma, but I would think it's closer to 1950s than to 1930s. The popular design patterns and layout of the decoration change slightly over the years, and this is characteristic of more rece...
  19. The Zuni owl probably dates to the ca. 1935-1960s. Earlier ones usually had feet. The dominant black decoration on the tips of the wings, beak, and "ears" and in the use of dots and lines covering m...
  20. Tesuque Rain God first, because that information can be confirmed by research done by Duane Anderson, and in his book "When Rain Gods Reigned." The hair detail, surface slip, and type of decoration...
  21. No, glaze is never put over metal. The vase is made from a commercial stoneware clay, of the type used by schools and many studio potters. What you are seeing is something in the clay itself, which...
  22. Yes, it's African. This is a traditional beaded head rest from Ethiopia.
  23. The material is coco bark fiber and palm leaves, from the Philippines. No tribe involved. These are exported by the millions, sold through florist supply outlets, craft shops, and wholesalers.
  24. Well, the second one, with the red and black design, is African, from Nigeria. The other one doesn't appear to be Native American, either, and may be African...but I can't guarantee that.
  25. The little strap handles on the shoulder are characteristic of early Chinese pottery, often referred to as "Chinese Brown Glazed Stoneware" (CBGS), from southern China. A web search for "Chinese ...
  26. All I can tell you is that the basket is one of the Pakistani imports sold all over the Southwest. It has a vaguely "southwest" look, but is made from date palm fiber. They also usually feature one s...
  27. This one isn't as common as the ones with two tall bell towers. The capital of Ayacucho (that's a typo in comment 1) is famous for its churches and as the center of Peruvian folk art. The pottery ...
  28. It's from Peru, most likely from the village of Quinua, in Ayachcho, which is famous for its pottery churches.
  29. It is Native American, a coiled cedar basket from Washington, with an imbricated design. If the bottom is round, and has a "watch-spring" start, it is most likely from the Plateau region, possib...
  30. Yes, it dates no earlier than the 1980s, since this style of clip that the thunderbird motif is on, was not made earlier. The clip itself is the key, since it is a mass-produced blank, purchased ...
  31. Native American jewelry is sometimes, but not always, stamped with a "sterling" stamp. Virtually no Native American jewelry makers use a "925" stamp, since that is associated with Mexican silver. ...
  32. Just to correct some misconceptions, the tourist market in the Southwest dates back to the late 1800s. Indian weavers and potters were some of the first to make items for sale. It was actually that...
  33. The basket is African, not Native American. It is a traditional style woven by the Mbundu people, of western Zambia. They are identified by the material they are woven from (the peeled and split...
  34. The one with the pattern is African, from Botswana. The middle one is likely African, also. It appears to be made with palm fiber. I would agree that they are not Native American, but I can't t...
  35. It isn't Native American, since it's glazed (NA traditional pottery never used glazes), and isn't in the style of any traditional Native American pottery. It may be a student project, or a beginnin...
  36. It isn't Native American, it's contemporary studio pottery. It is usually next to impossible to identify the potter, unless he or she is nationally known, since there are probably hundreds of thousa...
  37. The possibility of it being Native American can be eliminated, due to the fact that it is made from split bamboo, a material not used by any Native American tribe. It is Asian, a traditional st...
  38. It is a northwestern California twined basket, made from hazel, with decoration an overlay of beargrass (the light tan color), maidenhair fern (black), and woodwardia (reddish). It uses a half...
  39. It could be a simplified version of traditional Moroccan glazed pottery, influenced by Berber design patterns. Especially the pattern around the neck, with the triangles filled in with parallel line...
  40. Sorry, but it isn't Native American, it's African...made by the Lozi of Zambia.
  41. It's Mexican folk art, probably from the state of Puebla, based on the style of the little people, with their rather formless shapes. It looks older, but most likely dates to the 1940s/1950s when th...
  42. No, not Native American. It's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  43. The pot is from Santo (with an "o") Domingo Pueblo, but I do not know whose signature this is. Nor does it fit any of the Santo Domingo potters listed in Gregory Schaaf's "Southern Pueblo Pottery, 20...
  44. Definitely not Native American. The bone beads are from Indonesia. The silver-colored fish could be from Tibet, but most of them come from China today. They are widely available in craft se...
  45. The basket on the left is from the Philippines, the other one is African, most likely from Botswana. Both are contemporary.
  46. No, it's African, not Native American. It's made from palm fiber, which has a distinctive different look from yucca, which the only similar Native American baskets would be made from. So the fact t...
  47. Mexican, from the Toluca Valley region.
  48. Nope, no mixture of cultures here. It is African, from Botswana. Positively. Anyone truly familiar with African baskets should be able to recognize it immediately. It has the iconic flaring f...
  49. No, not Native American. It's African, most likely made by the Hausa of Nigeria.
  50. Right, not Native American. It's a twined Yanomami burden basket from the Amazon region of Brazil and Venezuela. Here's a web site to confirm: http://www.arte-amazonia.com/shop/amazon-baskets/yan...
  51. See more

Loves

MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old