CanyonRoad

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  1. Unless you know the artist's name, and that they are an enrolled member of a specific federally-recognized U.S. tribe, the bowl can't be sold as Native American Indian under the terms of the Indian Ar...
  2. It was thrown and trimmed on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a kiln...which pretty much rules out the possibility that there is any tribal affiliation, since traditional Native American pottery...
  3. No, not Native American. Very well could have been purchased in Arizona, but that doesn't make it Hopi. It's Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz, in northern Chihuahua. The pottery began ap...
  4. Pamunkey pottery, from the Pamunkey Reservation in Virginia. Not widely known, since there are only about 100 tribal members today. That little band of stick-figure images seems to be one of the sty...
  5. It's typical Isleta, dating late 1890s to ca. 1930. However, this style of pottery was introduced by Laguna potters who moved from Laguna to Isleta in the 1890s, and brought with them the white Lag...
  6. Looks like the remains of someone's meal...a round steak to be exact.
  7. Your pottery is from the town of Chulucanas, in the Morropón Province of Peru. It is contemporary. Chulucanas has become a pottery center of Peru, known for its distinctive, rounded, figural pots...
  8. It is African, the lid to a traditional style basket called an agaseke basket, made by the Tutsi, in Rwanda.
  9. ",,,what is a grinding stone arrorhead.." I have no idea what you are asking, or saying?
  10. It's a single-rod, coiled, rattan basket from Lombok, Indonesia. The distinctive rounded basket with the inset lid is a traditional form that has been made in Lombok for years, in several sizes, ...
  11. I realize this post is over 3 years old, but it still shows up on line when one does a search for "Lidia Renteria de Cota" or "Lidia R.C." Even though it is marked as "Solved" and Rosiegirl correctl...
  12. It's Mexican, from the Toluca Valley area, and probably dates ca. 1940s/1950s.
  13. No Navajo baskets here. Despite the claims one reads on line, virtually no Navajo baskets were made between the late 1890s and the 1990s. Religious and cultural restrictions/taboos discouraged wome...
  14. The first one is Pima, from southern Arizona. The other one is from northwestern California. It is most likely Hupa, although there are several other neighboring tribes that make the same type of tw...
  15. And thank you for getting back to us! So often it's never revealed what happens after posting here.
  16. No, wrong on all counts. This is a mola, a type of revese applique needlework, made by the Kuna, of the San Blas Islands of Panama. Originally made as part of the women's traditional blouse, most ...
  17. I would agree, circa 1930s/1940s.
  18. Hopi. Positively.
  19. No Native American tribe uses this combination of material and weaving technique. I would say it is most likely from India, where this technique of creating a design pattern by stitching over several...
  20. A replica or a prop of some sort, or a "decorator" piece. A real one wouldn't be painted, or made from plaster.
  21. It's not Native American. It is from the Philippines, made from a local vine called "nito."
  22. They are recent imports from China. Identified in "Art of the Basket, Contemporary Basketry from Around the World" by Bryan Sentance, as being made from a type of Chinese rush.
  23. It has the general look of some of the Indonesian "tribal style" sculpture being exported over the last couple decades...but I have never seen something exactly like this....
  24. It's African, a Masai beaded bracelet.
  25. No, definitely not Native American! I've seen this type of item before, it appears to be some type of kitsch souvenir caricature of tribal art. It may be from Indonesia, someplace in Africa, or ...
  26. This is a nkisi nkondi, sometimes translated as a "power figure," a traditional part of the Kongo culture. Whether or not this particular piece is "real," depends on how you define that. Was i...
  27. No, not Native American. The Navajo are the only Native American tribe that weaves rugs, and their weaving is identified not by the designs (since most of their design patterns actually originated in...
  28. Possibly early piece by Robert Kolden. He has a business now in Seattle, installing specialty finishes (cement and plaster), but attended art school in Chicago with an emphasis on ceramics. Here's...
  29. Sorry I missed your other post. I've been away from home, stuck with only a phone and undependable internet connections. I appreciate your responses to my posts, and certainly didn't mean to overloo...
  30. After seeing the first photo on a computer screen rather than my phone, I'd say they are Pima rather than Papago.
  31. The dark fire clouds indicate that this was traditionally fired, so that would rule out it being made by one of the factories like Cedar Mesa, Mesa Verde, or Ute Mountain. I can't tell from the ...
  32. Yes, I'd say the first figure, despite having lost his little bowl, is very much like the one on page 72 of the book. It's cream-slipped, and of the rather standardized form that had developed by 190...
  33. I agree, it is similar, in that both are coiled and use similar patterns and colors. The differences, as I see it, are that this looks like the coils were covered with raffia, rather than palm fiber....
  34. Thank you, kathrinescollections, I appreciate your comments! : )
  35. Your baskets are from Arizona; northwestern California; and southern Alaska/northern British Columbia, Canada. All date from the early 1900s to 1920s. The first two are coiled baskets, probably P...
  36. Definitely could be Mexican. In terms of pottery, 25 years old is "fairly recent." : )
  37. The rounded bottom, and the "splashed paint" decorating technique indicate that it is definitely not Native American. Other than that, I can't tell you for sure where it is from, but it looks like a ...
  38. Both pieces in the photos above are Isleta. The information above applied equally to both. As to the one on the right, it does have a similar checkerboard black and white design pattern, similar t...
  39. It's Isleta pottery, from Isleta Pueblo, New Mexico. This style of pottery, with the distinctive red scalloped bottom border, was only made from 1890 to 1930, and was a result of the influence of a ...
  40. The middle word is "Charlie," a fairly common Navajo surname, if that helps.
  41. Great pot, despite the damage. It may be a little difficult to positively identify, but you can rule out both Hopi and Zuni as possibilities. It looks like it dates ca.1920s/1930s. It is not a ...
  42. No, not Apache or Native American. It's African, from Zambia. It is what is called a makenge basket, made from the root of the local makenge bush. Simple red and black bands of decoration are ...
  43. The time period is right, but this is not Native American. It is what is generally called an Arts and Crafts Movement basket. These were made in the early 1900's by non-Indian women, who had an i...
  44. These are Mexican, and 1960-1990s would be right time period, but they are from Ameyaltepec, in the state of Guerrero, not from Oaxaca. If you'd like a reference to confirm, see the book "Ceramica,...
  45. This is a carving of a Corn Maiden, by G. Paul Toya, from Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico. Corn Maiden is an important figure with many legends/stories connected to her. G. Paul Toya has carved several s...
  46. Popular souvenir from Ecuador. You can find this type of stacked "totem-like" image rug with "ECUADOR" woven right in on the top or bottom. Here's a Sold Listing from eBay: 252420507971
  47. The construction technique rules out the possibility that this is Native American. No Native American Indian tribe uses this combination of stitching technique on their coiled baskets. I would sus...
  48. All I can tell you, as to origin, is that it isn't a Native American Indian basket. The coils are formed with a bundle technique, and wrapped with raffia. The designs were painted on, rather than ...
  49. Sorry I can't help with the studio pottery mug. It's just about impossible to identify studio pottery, unless it's by a famous nationally-known potter. There are just too many past and present pott...
  50. This is traditional Mexican pottery water jar, from Tonala, in the state of Jalisco. This particular type of pottery is called canelo (cinnamon) brunido. It is burnished, not glazed, which probably ...
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Loves

MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old

Likes

Possibly a Native American Woven Basket