CanyonRoad

Collections

CanyonRoad has not created any collections yet. What are collections?

Comments

  1. This one isn't as common as the ones with two tall bell towers. The capital of Ayacucho (that's a typo in comment 1) is famous for its churches and as the center of Peruvian folk art. The pottery ...
  2. It's from Peru, most likely from the village of Quinua, in Ayachcho, which is famous for its pottery churches.
  3. It is Native American, a coiled cedar basket from Washington, with an imbricated design. If the bottom is round, and has a "watch-spring" start, it is most likely from the Plateau region, possib...
  4. Yes, it dates no earlier than the 1980s, since this style of clip that the thunderbird motif is on, was not made earlier. The clip itself is the key, since it is a mass-produced blank, purchased ...
  5. Native American jewelry is sometimes, but not always, stamped with a "sterling" stamp. Virtually no Native American jewelry makers use a "925" stamp, since that is associated with Mexican silver. ...
  6. Just to correct some misconceptions, the tourist market in the Southwest dates back to the late 1800s. Indian weavers and potters were some of the first to make items for sale. It was actually that...
  7. The basket is African, not Native American. It is a traditional style woven by the Mbundu people, of western Zambia. They are identified by the material they are woven from (the peeled and split...
  8. The one with the pattern is African, from Botswana. The middle one is likely African, also. It appears to be made with palm fiber. I would agree that they are not Native American, but I can't t...
  9. It isn't Native American, since it's glazed (NA traditional pottery never used glazes), and isn't in the style of any traditional Native American pottery. It may be a student project, or a beginnin...
  10. It isn't Native American, it's contemporary studio pottery. It is usually next to impossible to identify the potter, unless he or she is nationally known, since there are probably hundreds of thousa...
  11. The possibility of it being Native American can be eliminated, due to the fact that it is made from split bamboo, a material not used by any Native American tribe. It is Asian, a traditional st...
  12. It is a northwestern California twined basket, made from hazel, with decoration an overlay of beargrass (the light tan color), maidenhair fern (black), and woodwardia (reddish). It uses a half...
  13. It could be a simplified version of traditional Moroccan glazed pottery, influenced by Berber design patterns. Especially the pattern around the neck, with the triangles filled in with parallel line...
  14. Sorry, but it isn't Native American, it's African...made by the Lozi of Zambia.
  15. It's Mexican folk art, probably from the state of Puebla, based on the style of the little people, with their rather formless shapes. It looks older, but most likely dates to the 1940s/1950s when th...
  16. No, not Native American. It's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  17. The pot is from Santo (with an "o") Domingo Pueblo, but I do not know whose signature this is. Nor does it fit any of the Santo Domingo potters listed in Gregory Schaaf's "Southern Pueblo Pottery, 20...
  18. Definitely not Native American. The bone beads are from Indonesia. The silver-colored fish could be from Tibet, but most of them come from China today. They are widely available in craft se...
  19. The basket on the left is from the Philippines, the other one is African, most likely from Botswana. Both are contemporary.
  20. No, it's African, not Native American. It's made from palm fiber, which has a distinctive different look from yucca, which the only similar Native American baskets would be made from. So the fact t...
  21. Mexican, from the Toluca Valley region.
  22. Nope, no mixture of cultures here. It is African, from Botswana. Positively. Anyone truly familiar with African baskets should be able to recognize it immediately. It has the iconic flaring f...
  23. No, not Native American. It's African, most likely made by the Hausa of Nigeria.
  24. Right, not Native American. It's a twined Yanomami burden basket from the Amazon region of Brazil and Venezuela. Here's a web site to confirm: http://www.arte-amazonia.com/shop/amazon-baskets/yan...
  25. Sorry, but it's not Native American. Where something was purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. This, for example, is a split bamboo sewing basket, from China. They must have...
  26. The first one appears to be a North-western California basket cap (would need a photo of the part that's resting on the table to confirm it's a cap...it would have decorative elements in three distin...
  27. It's a ceramic insulator, from a power line.
  28. This isn't Native American. It's a Chimayo weaving, from the area around Chimayo, New Mexico. There is no tribal affiliation. The weavers are all descendants of the early Spanish settlers in th...
  29. You can tell by the way the antler pieces have been sliced off and drilled, that they are new, and show absolutely no wear. The beads are also new, available in bead shops and craft supply stores. ...
  30. Possibly Leo Yazzie, active 1975-present, listed in Gregory Schaaf's "American Indian Jewelry I, 1200 Artist Biographies."
  31. No, not Native American. It's African, from Botswana.
  32. It's Hualapai, (pronounced, and sometimes spelled "Walapai," from the Grand Canyon region of Arizona. It's a twined basket, made for sale to tourists and collectors, and is one of the most common for...
  33. The three masks you have posted fit more into the decorator category, than actual African masks. As such, they may have been made in a country other than the one where the original mask that they res...
  34. It's very attractive, but I'd say it's unlikely that this is Native American, since it's marked 925. Very few Native Americans use that marking, because it's usually associated with Mexican jewelry...
  35. Not American Indian. It's Mexican, a distinctive style made in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico, and popular souvenir items for years. If you want to confirm, here is a link to the Universit...
  36. It does resemble pottery, but it isn't. This is actually a soapstone bowl, from Africa. Usually marketed as "Kisii soapstone," a wide variety of items are made in the Kisii district of Kenya. H...
  37. All I can tell you is that it definitely isn't Native American Indian, since it was thrown and decorated on a potter's wheel, and has that metal band around the neck. Black clay pottery is made in ...
  38. The Chinese have been flooding the U.S. market with pottery that looks like studio pottery. I've heard they have actually gone to U.S. craft fairs and purchased items from the potters, to take back t...
  39. No, not Native American. The pot is Tarahumara, from Mexico. Someone probably added the fetishes and feathers, hoping to pass this off as Native American Indian, but no American Indian tribe makes a...
  40. This type of scratched in signature is almost always an indication of hobby or student work, regardless of how interesting the pot is or the type of glaze used. The right glaze can make up for a lot ...
  41. This is known as an amate painting, a folk art from Mexico. It is done on a type of paper made from the bark of the ficus tree. The name comes from the Nahuatl "amatl" which means "paper." The proc...
  42. Sorry, but this isn't an antique decoy. It's a "decorative" decoy made in, most likely, Indonesia...and made to have an antique look. The whole thing was painted, and then all the rough edges of the...
  43. I agree, Tarahumara. Sorry for the hasty conclusion. I at least can blame it on attempting to respond from a hospital bed, based on the small photo on my phone...and a cloudy mind from surgery and d...
  44. Not Native American, no Native American Indian tribe makes anything like this style of pottery. Colors, maybe, like orange/black/white, are similar to those used by some southwest tribes. But this ...
  45. It's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria or neighboring Niger.
  46. Your thought was correct...Guatemala.
  47. The basket was most likely a recent gift or purchase when your grandmother was using it in her 80s. It doesn't date earlier than the 1970s. It is African, from the Bolgatanga region of Ghana. Com...
  48. This is a poster paint pot from Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico. Two tribes, Tesuque and Jemez, made similar inexpensive souvenir items, decorated with poster paint (and later acrylic paint, when it beca...
  49. Whether or not something is Native American is not determined by the symbols or decoration on the object, but rather by the material used, the method of construction, the form itself, and, most import...
  50. Not related in any way to Native American Indian art. The symbol of the eye within the hand is called the hamsa hand, and originated in the Middle East and North Africa. It is seen as a protection ...
  51. See more

Loves

MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old