CanyonRoad

Collections

CanyonRoad has not created any collections yet. What are collections?

Comments

  1. You're welcome, looks like a great example!
  2. The terms used depend on the where you are from. The easiest way to distinguish is by using the Japanese words. In Japan, this technique would be "nerikomi", as opposed to "neriage" (which it is oft...
  3. It was just your father's private joke. This isn't a peace pipe, isn't Native American. Its an antique German pipe. But if it kept the peace, it served the purpose, regardless of where it was made...
  4. The Navajo only make rugs. Period. They do not make blankets. I have no idea what other agenda you have going on. I simply saw your query about the item, and gave you a detailed, documented answ...
  5. There are no such websites, talking about "all types of Navajo fabrics," because the Navajo do not make anything but rugs, and haven't since the 1800's. Even then, they made wearing robes, not anyth...
  6. The "fabric losing threads" that you refer to is actually the top and bottom, as the piece was woven on the loom...not "both sides." The threads you see are the white warp threads (the vertical thre...
  7. G. Madelena is Genevieve Madelena, born April 26, 1931, who began making pottery in the l940's, according to Gregory Schaaf's "Southern Pueblo Pottery, 2000 Artist Biographies." Jemez Pueblo is one...
  8. Native American potters never used a potter's wheel, or glazed their pottery.
  9. It's Mexican pottery, from Oaxaca.
  10. G. Madelena is the signature of Genevieve Madelena, listed Jemez potter from Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico. According to Gregory Schaaf's "Southern Pueblo Pottery, 2000 Artist Biographies," she was activ...
  11. Tapa cloth from Samoa, to be specific. called siapo in Samoa. Tapa cloth from each island group differs in the way it is made, and the patterns used, so it is possible to identify where it was made. ...
  12. I do know for sure. It is not Native American, however, it is Mexican. This is a traditional Texcoco pattern weaving, from Texcoco, close to Mexico City. It's not Native American, because the Nav...
  13. It's an interesting image, but first of all, this is not a little Indian girl. Or if it is, the question should be why is she is somehow wearing her big brother's clothing? (Does that account for th...
  14. Folk art carving from Guatemala. A standard design, which explains why you see more than one that appear similar. The "starry" eyes with lashes all the way around are an identifying feature of Guat...
  15. This isn't a kachina doll. It is a Navajo carving. Only the pueblo Indians have kachinas, and only the Hopi and Zuni carve authentic kachina dolls for sale, that accurately represent the actual kach...
  16. Before you get too excited, be aware that fake Dali work has flooded the market. It is highly unlikely that these are real. Just to a web search for "Dali fakes" to begin your research. Here's a ...
  17. The arm bands and beaded skirt are not Native American. The skirt is African, probably Zulu.
  18. These are African, made by the Zulu, from discarded telephone wire. There's even a book out about them: "Wired: Contemporary Zulu Telephone Wire Baskets" by David Arment and Marisa Fick-Jordaan .
  19. No, not Native American. It's a factory-made souvenir item with an "Indian" theme. Not silver, or turquoise, either, just a silver-colored metal and turquoise-colored glass, made in Southwest style.
  20. That's not a drum. These are traditional equipale furniture stools from Mexico. http://community.ebay.com/t5/Archive-Collectibles/Help-us-settle-a-family-feud-Drum-Stool-Native-American/td-p/2826...
  21. It's a real traditional style, made for years. But they don't last long with use, and in the climate, so most likely made in the last half of the 20th century.
  22. Not Polynesian. The hair treatment, the earrings, and the style of carving indicate Borneo, or perhaps the Philippines.
  23. It's African, a traditional milk or water bottle, from Kenya.
  24. Not Native American, however. This is contemporary studio or classroom pottery, made from commercial stoneware clay, glazed, and fired in a gas kiln...none of which is true of Native American pottery...
  25. Yes, its African, a Baule figure, from the Ivory Coast.
  26. A whole year and this is still unsolved? It's a pintail duck decoy, made by the Armstrong Featherweight Decoy Company, of Houston, Texas. The company dated from 1938-1945. Mystery solved.
  27. It's a "ngide," a traditional doll from the Turkana tribe of Kenya. Not a fertility doll, these are made for and given to young girls. The Turkana also make a doll called an "ikidet," made from pal...
  28. This is a "Southwest Style" decorator item, not Native American. So it can't be called either Navajo or Zuni, although the imagery appears to be based on Navajo sand painting designs. Pottery decor...
  29. I'm sorry, but these are not Native American. These are copies of Native American design patterns, made in Pakistan. Unlike Native American baskets, these are made from palm fiber. No Native A...
  30. The term "Native American" is a legal one, and applies to federal and state-recognized U.S. tribes. It is not a term used or recognized in Mexico, where the indigenous people are referred to eith...
  31. This is Isleta, from Isleta Pueblo, south of Albuerque, New Mexico. No relation at all to either the Apache or the Hopi. This style of pottery was made from the late 1890's to the 1930's at Isleta...
  32. This isn't Navajo, based on the clay and the way the pot is made. Navajo clay is buff-colored, and the Navajo finish their pottery with a distinctive pinon pine pitch, applied to the red-hot pot whe...
  33. This is burnished Tonala ware, a traditional style of pottery from the state of Jalisco, in west central Mexico. The tag is inaccurate (like a lot of tags added by former owners), since there is no ...
  34. Most of these simple pots, with the distinctive raw hide wrapping, are made by the Tarahumara, from the Copper Canyon area of Mexico.
  35. It's a coiled yucca basket, from southern Arizona, made by a Papago (now called Tohono O'odham) basketmaker. I've never seen one exactly like this before, but it's definitely Papago!
  36. You are entitled to your opinion, of course, but you need to be aware that you cannot offer these for sale as "Native American." Native American is a legal definition, and under the Indian Arts and ...
  37. It's a contemporary decorator item, made to look old, evidenced by the fact that it was made from a commercial stoneware clay, and thrown on a potter's wheel. So most likely the only significance of...
  38. I can solve the mystery. This is positively Mata Ortiz. The potter is Otila Sandoval de Ortiz, listed in "The Many Faces of Mata Ortiz." Some Mata Ortiz pots do resemble Hopi in the color of th...
  39. These aren't Native American. You'll find items like this commonly in Hawaii, and other Pacific island souvenir shops. Necklaces made from these seeds were very popular in the 1960's-1970's "hi...
  40. It's Yupik Eskimo (actually Cup'ig, a sub-division of Yupik), from Nunivak Island, Alaska. (Not a guess.)
  41. It's a Shasta mush bowl basket, from northern California, first half of 20th century, twined, made from hazel shoots.
  42. No, it's not Native American. It's a traditional Mexican folk art black pottery whistle from Oaxaca. See Amanda Thompson's book, "Ceramica, Mexican Pottery of the 20th Century" to confirm, or do a w...
  43. Great basket, only problem is, it isn't Pima. This is a coiled cedar basket, with imbricated design, from the Thompson River area of British Columbia. (Pima do not use cedar in their baskets, and i...
  44. These are not Native American, they are Indonesian. These are traditional Dayak artifacts, from Kalimantan (Borneo). The rug they are on is Mexican.
  45. Sorry, this is a contemporary decorator item with a "Southwest" motif, not Native American. No Native American tribe makes this style of pottery. Southwest "style" was especially popular in the ...
  46. This is made by the Cedar Mesa Pottery Company, in Blanding, Utah. It's their design line called "Desert Rainbow." They are a manufacturer/wholesaler dealing in souvenir pottery for the tourist...
  47. Sorry, but these are not old, nor Native American. They are bone, however. They are contemporary imports from Indonesia, available in most bead shops or stores that sell beading supplies, and flea m...
  48. These appear to be Mexican souvenir items, or parts thereof. The horn items, especially, are commonly found in Mexican shops. The small black item looks like a hoof (sheep or goat, commonly). They...
  49. This is contemporary classroom or studio pottery, made from commercial stoneware clay, thrown and trimmed on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a gas kiln...none of which is true of Native America...
  50. Canyon de Chelly is part of the Navajo Reservation, a long way from the Hopi Reservation. I would seriously doubt that a Hopi kachina carver would be selling at Canyon de Chelly. You will, instead...
  51. See more