CanyonRoad

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  1. Sorry I missed your other post. I've been away from home, stuck with only a phone and undependable internet connections. I appreciate your responses to my posts, and certainly didn't mean to overloo...
  2. After seeing the first photo on a computer screen rather than my phone, I'd say they are Pima rather than Papago.
  3. The dark fire clouds indicate that this was traditionally fired, so that would rule out it being made by one of the factories like Cedar Mesa, Mesa Verde, or Ute Mountain. I can't tell from the ...
  4. Yes, I'd say the first figure, despite having lost his little bowl, is very much like the one on page 72 of the book. It's cream-slipped, and of the rather standardized form that had developed by 190...
  5. I agree, it is similar, in that both are coiled and use similar patterns and colors. The differences, as I see it, are that this looks like the coils were covered with raffia, rather than palm fiber....
  6. Thank you, kathrinescollections, I appreciate your comments! : )
  7. Your baskets are from Arizona; northwestern California; and southern Alaska/northern British Columbia, Canada. All date from the early 1900s to 1920s. The first two are coiled baskets, probably P...
  8. Definitely could be Mexican. In terms of pottery, 25 years old is "fairly recent." : )
  9. The rounded bottom, and the "splashed paint" decorating technique indicate that it is definitely not Native American. Other than that, I can't tell you for sure where it is from, but it looks like a ...
  10. Both pieces in the photos above are Isleta. The information above applied equally to both. As to the one on the right, it does have a similar checkerboard black and white design pattern, similar t...
  11. It's Isleta pottery, from Isleta Pueblo, New Mexico. This style of pottery, with the distinctive red scalloped bottom border, was only made from 1890 to 1930, and was a result of the influence of a ...
  12. The middle word is "Charlie," a fairly common Navajo surname, if that helps.
  13. Great pot, despite the damage. It may be a little difficult to positively identify, but you can rule out both Hopi and Zuni as possibilities. It looks like it dates ca.1920s/1930s. It is not a ...
  14. No, not Apache or Native American. It's African, from Zambia. It is what is called a makenge basket, made from the root of the local makenge bush. Simple red and black bands of decoration are ...
  15. The time period is right, but this is not Native American. It is what is generally called an Arts and Crafts Movement basket. These were made in the early 1900's by non-Indian women, who had an i...
  16. These are Mexican, and 1960-1990s would be right time period, but they are from Ameyaltepec, in the state of Guerrero, not from Oaxaca. If you'd like a reference to confirm, see the book "Ceramica,...
  17. This is a carving of a Corn Maiden, by G. Paul Toya, from Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico. Corn Maiden is an important figure with many legends/stories connected to her. G. Paul Toya has carved several s...
  18. Popular souvenir from Ecuador. You can find this type of stacked "totem-like" image rug with "ECUADOR" woven right in on the top or bottom. Here's a Sold Listing from eBay: 252420507971
  19. The construction technique rules out the possibility that this is Native American. No Native American Indian tribe uses this combination of stitching technique on their coiled baskets. I would sus...
  20. All I can tell you, as to origin, is that it isn't a Native American Indian basket. The coils are formed with a bundle technique, and wrapped with raffia. The designs were painted on, rather than ...
  21. Sorry I can't help with the studio pottery mug. It's just about impossible to identify studio pottery, unless it's by a famous nationally-known potter. There are just too many past and present pott...
  22. This is traditional Mexican pottery water jar, from Tonala, in the state of Jalisco. This particular type of pottery is called canelo (cinnamon) brunido. It is burnished, not glazed, which probably ...
  23. The style of the drawings, and the peeling paint, indicate that this was made in China, not Russia. Chinese knockoffs of the traditional Russian Matryoshka are common today, but often don't have the ...
  24. This is the head of a wooden rod puppet, used in the "Wayang golek" puppet theater in Java, Indonesia. It portrays the monkey warrior Hanuman,
  25. Probably not worth repairing at that cost unless it has sentimental value. It could be replaced by a similar bracelet for less than that.
  26. Go ahead and use it, it isn't the signature of Maurice Grossman, and doesn't resemble his work. There are no examples of his work signed with an incised mark like this. He signed with iron oxid...
  27. The stamp indicates it was made by Bell Trading Company, and is not Native American. The Bell Trading Company was started in 1932 in Albuquerque. Although it did sell some authentic items made ...
  28. No, not Native American. It's Chinese, based on the material used and the construction technique. The long stitches left on the inside, is not found on any Native American tribes' baskets. It is c...
  29. Traditionally, birchbark and quill baskets were made by tribes in the northeastern U.S., from Maine to the Great Lakes, and by neighboring tribes in Canada. That would include the Micmac, Ojibwe, Ot...
  30. The design is based on traditional early images, but the little pot itself is contemporary, from Cusco, Peru.
  31. The design patterns and colors are consistent with Polacca Polychrome (Hopi) circa 1890s. I wouldn't pass judgment on the authenticity based just on one photo, however. But that would be where I wou...
  32. There are replicas and "look-alikes" of Native American baskets made in both Africa, and Pakistan. The main difference is that Pakistani baskets are usually intentional copies made to deceive, since ...
  33. Glad I can help out on some items. Thank you for the encouraging comments!
  34. They are "Southwest style" palm fiber baskets, made in Pakistan. Attractive, but not Native American, just designed to look like they might be.
  35. It's Pima (now called Akimel O'odham), from southern Arizona, a coiled willow basket, with devils claw black decoration.
  36. They are all from Lombok, Indonesia.
  37. It's from Lombok, Indonesia.
  38. This basket is from Lombok, Indonesia.
  39. No, not Native American. It's African, from Zambia. It's made from the roots of the makenge bush, native to Zambia. The baskets are sold as Fair Trade baskets, made by Mbunda women, and provide th...
  40. It's Mexican, not Native American, from the Toluca Valley in central Mexico. Made from palm fiber, and dates to the 1940/1950s. Here's a current listing from eBay for a similar one: 122300555211
  41. Not a set, just three souvenir pottery pieces. The one with the two bowls joined by a handle is a form that dates back to pre Columbian pottery. No connection to weddings.
  42. The basket is African, not Native American. It's from the Binga district of Zimbabwe, made from ilala palm fiber. The distinctive square plaited start is a main identifying feature of these bask...
  43. It isn't Native American. This is traditional pottery from Quibor, in the state of Lara, Venezuela. The area is known for its pottery with its unique design patterns. Here is an eBay listing, with ...
  44. Although Taos and Picuris Pueblos are usually thought of as specializing in micaceous pottery, it is, or has been, made at every Southwest pueblo with the possible exception of Zia and Zuni. The Jic...
  45. Redware and stoneware are two separate categories of ceramics, determined by the temperatures at which they are fired. Redware is an earthenware, fired to a lower temperature than stoneware, and ...
  46. No Native American tribe makes black pottery with this style of decoration, and this type of handles. Black pottery, however, is made in a lot of other places, like Mexico, China, Romania, many count...
  47. The basket is African, from Botswana. The small circular start in the bottom is a key identifying feature of these African baskets, which are often mistaken for Native American Indian. They are made...
  48. Sorry, this isn't Navajo or Native American. It's a kilim, from the Middle East. Navajo rugs are never woven with fringe on the ends, as it is impossible to do so on a Navajo loom. They also use ...
  49. No, not Native American, since it has fringe on both ends and uses a split stitch technique...neither of which is ever found on NA rugs. Sorry I can't tell you what it is, only what it isn't....
  50. It appears to be incised pottery. The colors and style of patterns in the bands around the rim look like contemporary Chorotega pottery from Costa Rica. ( See: http://www.bluecoyotegallery.com/Co...
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