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  1. No, it's African, not Native American. A bundle-coiled palm fiber basket, that resembles some Native American basketry, but is the wrong combination of materials, construction techniques, colors, an...
  2. Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico.
  3. This is a classic shape and design pattern, from Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico. Called either a pottery basket, or a "double spout pitcher," it probably dates circa 1930s. If you'd like a referen...
  4. You're right, they are early 20th century souvenir figurines from Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico. Here's a very similar frog, sold through Adobe Gallery (one of the most-reputable galleries dealing wit...
  5. The only thing I can tell you, is that it definitely isn't Native American Indian pottery....
  6. Glad to find out that wasn't a break! Everything looks right...I'd say it deserves a far better display presentation, rather than being stuck next to a factory-made Skookum doll. And if it isn'...
  7. Main thing to check for concerning the coiling, is the specific technique, if that can be determined. Yokuts baskets are traditionally "bundle" coiled, where the coil is made up of "bundle" of shor...
  8. Based solely on the photo, I would agree that it does appear to be Yokuts. (Yokuts is a pretty general category, however, and can apply to some 40 related groups in south-central California.) I do...
  9. It's a contemporary souvenir pictorial rug from Egypt. Don't try to read too much of a story from it. The weaver wanted to weave something that would attract a buyer, so put in symbols that she ...
  10. All I can tell you is that it isn't Native American, since it was thrown on a potter's wheel, which Native American potters never used.
  11. This is African, a traditional milk gourd from Kenya. Unlike many beaded ones made for the souvenir/tourist trade, yours has the authenticity of actually having seen tribal use.
  12. This is contemporary studio pottery. Since they were thrown and trimmed on a potter's wheel, that eliminates any traditional Native American pottery, since American Indians never used a potter's whe...
  13. Regardless of where it was purchased, it's a Navajo rug...no other Native American Indian tribe weaves rugs. (Navajo rugs were even sold by mail order catalogs in the early 1900s, so they can be fou...
  14. One of the collectible features of these dolls is that they are all handmade and different...so you are not likely to see two exactly alike. What many have in common are the wire neck bands, the wh...
  15. This is a generally called a kyusu, or Japanese teapot, specifically a yokode kyusu, a Japanese teapot with a side handle, used for brewing green tea. The design for the side handle was adapted ...
  16. This is a beaded Ndebele doll, from South Africa. Originally, larger dolls like this were made as fertility figures, but now the dolls are made in all sizes, for sale, and making them is a much-neede...
  17. "I know that some of these people would also say that they are Native American, despite the legal definitions." Exactly why the law was enacted. The federal Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 is a...
  18. It isn't Native American. The OP thought it "appears to be Native American," but it is actually Shipibo. There are several sub-groups of the Shipibo, living in the Amazon rainforest of Peru, Ecuador...
  19. It's Shipibo, from the Amazon region of Peru. Although they have made plain, undecorated utilitarian pottery for years, this type of decorated ware, made for the collector and souvenir market, was fi...
  20. It's Mexican, traditional burnished pottery (barro bruñido) from Tonala, state of Jalisco. It is not glazed. Before it is fired, the pot is coated with a thin slip (liquid clay) which is polishe...
  21. Better count those stars, because it makes a big difference in value. That is, providing it is authentic. 48 is common, 40 is extremely rare. Here's a web site giving dates for all the flags: h...
  22. Nope, not Native American, or African. He's from the Philippines.
  23. This is a Mexican Saltillo, not a Navajo weaving. The design pattern (a central diamond, with colorful bands on the ends of the rug) is named for the region of Mexico where it originated. That, and ...
  24. No, I'm afraid it isn't Cheyenne, or as old as you were led to believe. The style of the painting, especially the eagle, horses, and Indians, indicates it dates to the 1950s or newer, since these are...
  25. It is Indonesian, from Bali. See my answer for your other basket post for more complete information.
  26. Sorry, but no, this is not Salish or Native American Indian. Nor is the black design imbrication. This is a contemporary import from Bali, Indonesia. It's made from woven rattan, not the cedar ...
  27. Most of what has been written about the Lenape "symbols" or pictographs, sometimes called the "Red Record," has been proven to be a complete hoax, as anyone familiar with Native American history will ...
  28. They may have been bought in the Southwest, but they are not Native American. These are contemporary imports from Pakistan, made from palm fiber. Pakistani copies of Indian basket designs are, unfor...
  29. No Native American tribe had any form of a written language until a Cherokee alphabet was invented in the 1800s, and this sure isn't Cherokee. Those are nothing more than a couple interesting rocks,...
  30. Just be aware that you can't lump all indigenous peoples under one label. Some object very strongly to the term "Native American," some want to be known as "American Indians." But most would probabl...
  31. This isn't Navajo or Native American, it's Hispanic...from Chimayo, New Mexico. The weavers are all descendants of the early Spanish settlers, who came to the area around Chimayo in the northern Rio ...
  32. Legally, however, under the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, the terms "Indian" and "Native American" can apply only to federally-recognized U.S. tribes. It isn't a matter of opinion or point of v...
  33. It's not Alaskan or Native American, it's a traditional coiled basket from Lombok, Indonesia.
  34. It's traditional Ameyaltepec pottery, from the state of Guerrero. Not related to either Native American, or Tonala, pottery
  35. These are traditional twined spruce root baskets, made by the Tlingit Indians, along the borders of Alaska and Canada. They are not Inuit or Eskimo...nor are they an extinct tribe! The baskets are...
  36. Santo Domingo polychrome pottery, from Santo Domingo Puebo, New Mexico. It dates after 1930, and was made for the tourist trade. Santo Domingo Polychrome (which features these distinctive flora...
  37. It's African, a traditional bread basket made in Morocco, woven from esparto grass. If you want to confirm, one is illustrated in "Art of the Basket, Traditional Basketry from Around the World" by Br...
  38. It appears to be American raku (a process developed by Paul Soldner in the 1960s, also called post-firing reduction) so is likely a one-of-a-kind piece, made by a studio potter, or one of the many th...
  39. The Estwing (no "a") Manufacturing Company is located in Rockford, Illinois. It's been a leading manufacturer of specialty hand tools, focusing on axes, hatchets, hammers, pry bars etc. since 1923.
  40. Unfortunately, these are contemporary imports from Pakistan, made from ilala palm fiber. 100% sure.
  41. Appears to be a circa 1950s Estwing "sportsman's axe."
  42. I'd say it dates to the mid- to last half of the 20th century.
  43. Thank you, antiquerose! I'm sorry I didn't see the question about the other post until now. (But the pitcher in the other post is Mexican pottery, from the state of Guerrero.)
  44. It's Mexican, from the state of Guerrero. If you'd like a reference, similar examples are shown in "The Popular Arts of Mexico" by Kojin Toneyama (that's not a typo!) and "Ceramica" by Amanda Thompson.
  45. It's a great little item, and an unusual form. It's not uncommon for the dolls to sell in the $1000-2000 range. Smaller pieces like mugs go for less, but this one might surprise you.
  46. The paper has nothing to do with the pottery. This is a Mohave "effigy cup" made for the tourist/souvenir market in the early 1900s. It's from the southern California/Arizona border area. The rail...
  47. Probably found at a local craft fair, since it is contemporary. It was raku fired, so dates to no earlier than the late 1960s. Raku, or more properly called, American raku, is a process developed by...
  48. Sorry it wasn't better news....
  49. It's a recent import from Pakistan, made from ilala palm fiber, designed to deceive. Patterns are taken from Native American Indian baskets, but made from local materials in Pakistan, by Pakistan...
  50. It's Mexican, a variation of a Saltillo pattern, with two Aztec figures replacing the usual diamond.
  51. See more

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