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  1. The term "Native American" is a legal one, and applies to federal and state-recognized U.S. tribes. It is not a term used or recognized in Mexico, where the indigenous people are referred to eith...
  2. This is Isleta, from Isleta Pueblo, south of Albuerque, New Mexico. No relation at all to either the Apache or the Hopi. This style of pottery was made from the late 1890's to the 1930's at Isleta...
  3. This isn't Navajo, based on the clay and the way the pot is made. Navajo clay is buff-colored, and the Navajo finish their pottery with a distinctive pinon pine pitch, applied to the red-hot pot whe...
  4. This is burnished Tonala ware, a traditional style of pottery from the state of Jalisco, in west central Mexico. The tag is inaccurate (like a lot of tags added by former owners), since there is no ...
  5. Most of these simple pots, with the distinctive raw hide wrapping, are made by the Tarahumara, from the Copper Canyon area of Mexico.
  6. It's a coiled yucca basket, from southern Arizona, made by a Papago (now called Tohono O'odham) basketmaker. I've never seen one exactly like this before, but it's definitely Papago!
  7. You are entitled to your opinion, of course, but you need to be aware that you cannot offer these for sale as "Native American." Native American is a legal definition, and under the Indian Arts and ...
  8. It's a contemporary decorator item, made to look old, evidenced by the fact that it was made from a commercial stoneware clay, and thrown on a potter's wheel. So most likely the only significance of...
  9. I can solve the mystery. This is positively Mata Ortiz. The potter is Otila Sandoval de Ortiz, listed in "The Many Faces of Mata Ortiz." Some Mata Ortiz pots do resemble Hopi in the color of th...
  10. These aren't Native American. You'll find items like this commonly in Hawaii, and other Pacific island souvenir shops. Necklaces made from these seeds were very popular in the 1960's-1970's "hi...
  11. It's Yupik Eskimo (actually Cup'ig, a sub-division of Yupik), from Nunivak Island, Alaska. (Not a guess.)
  12. It's a Shasta mush bowl basket, from northern California, first half of 20th century, twined, made from hazel shoots.
  13. No, it's not Native American. It's a traditional Mexican folk art black pottery whistle from Oaxaca. See Amanda Thompson's book, "Ceramica, Mexican Pottery of the 20th Century" to confirm, or do a w...
  14. Great basket, only problem is, it isn't Pima. This is a coiled cedar basket, with imbricated design, from the Thompson River area of British Columbia. (Pima do not use cedar in their baskets, and i...
  15. These are not Native American, they are Indonesian. These are traditional Dayak artifacts, from Kalimantan (Borneo). The rug they are on is Mexican.
  16. Sorry, this is a contemporary decorator item with a "Southwest" motif, not Native American. No Native American tribe makes this style of pottery. Southwest "style" was especially popular in the ...
  17. This is made by the Cedar Mesa Pottery Company, in Blanding, Utah. It's their design line called "Desert Rainbow." They are a manufacturer/wholesaler dealing in souvenir pottery for the tourist...
  18. Sorry, but these are not old, nor Native American. They are bone, however. They are contemporary imports from Indonesia, available in most bead shops or stores that sell beading supplies, and flea m...
  19. These appear to be Mexican souvenir items, or parts thereof. The horn items, especially, are commonly found in Mexican shops. The small black item looks like a hoof (sheep or goat, commonly). They...
  20. This is contemporary classroom or studio pottery, made from commercial stoneware clay, thrown and trimmed on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a gas kiln...none of which is true of Native America...
  21. Canyon de Chelly is part of the Navajo Reservation, a long way from the Hopi Reservation. I would seriously doubt that a Hopi kachina carver would be selling at Canyon de Chelly. You will, instead...
  22. Sorry, but it isn't Native American. Native American basketry is my specialty, so I can't tell you exactly where this is from...only that it isn't from any part of the USA. This way of attachin...
  23. I think you mean "Susie" rather than "Sussie." At first I thought it was a typo, but then you used "Sussie" 5 more times. The weaver was Susie Cly Yazzie. I don't know who Sussie may be.
  24. It's a well-made, attractive basket, but it's African, not Native American.
  25. The fringe is cotton. This style of knotting on the ends was popular in the 1950's, and earlier.
  26. It's a Mexican Saltlillo, made for the souvenir trade. Cannot be sold as "Native American" under the terms of the federal Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, which limits the use of "Indian" and "Nat...
  27. These are Mexican Saltillo weavings, made in Mexico for the souvenir market. They come in all sizes, from coaster-size to bedspreads. The brightly colored stripes with a central solid band (often ...
  28. This is Mexican, not Navajo. It's from the Texcoco region, northeast of Mexico City.
  29. I can only observe that if all the non-Native American items were removed from here, there wouldn't be much left! It apparently isn't a requirement for posting in the Native American category. But ...
  30. Made from palm fiber, rather than corn husks, it's not Native American.
  31. Not Native American. These are made in the Altiplano region of Mexico.
  32. This one is from Lombok, Indonesia, and made from a local grass called "ketak". It originally had a lid. The little round hole at the bottom where the basket was started is a key identifying featur...
  33. Great find! Just in the interest of accuracy, though, there is no "Pueblo" tribe. There are 19 separate and independent tribes in New Mexico (Santa Clara is one of them), plus Isleta del Sur in T...
  34. This was decorated by a Navajo tribe member, but it is not Navajo pottery, despite the number of claims found by a google earch. It is factory-made souvenir giftware, made by the Cedar Mesa Pottery C...
  35. It's a poster-paint souvenir item from either Tesuque or Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico (the only two pueblos that made this type of ware.) Jemez clay is generally pinkish, Tesuque clay is usually a buff ...
  36. This is a contemporary Mexican import, made by the Tarahumara of the Copper Canyon region of central Mexico. These pots are made for sale to tourists, who probably buy them because they are handmade...
  37. I can tell you that it positively isn't Native American, if that helps. It's a form commonly called a wine jar or wine jug, made throughout the Mediterranean area.
  38. Too small for a saddle blanket. Single saddle blankets are in the range of 30" X 30" to 36" x 38". The remnants of fringe on one edge indicates that this was a Navajo Gallup Throw, a small quickly...
  39. When Mata Ortiz pottery was first made (in the late 1970's-1980's), it was called "Casas Grandes revival" because the designs were based on the pre-historic Casas Grandes (with an "s") pottery found ...
  40. They are from Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico, and date to ca. 1940's-1950's. The way each was fired determined the color. They were made the same way, from the same clay, but the black is a resul...
  41. It's a fairly common stoneware American (not Native American) stoneware jug, glazed with Albany slip. Do a web search for "stoneware jug Albany slip" for more information: http://odysseysvirtualmuse...
  42. This is not an authentic Hopi kachina doll. It is a decorative souvenir carving made by the Navajo. Whenever you see rabbit fur, leather, yarn, or lots of feathers, it's a sign that it is Navajo-ma...
  43. This is a souvenir Navajo carving, not an authentic Hopi or Pueblo kachina doll. Like most Navajo "kachina" carvings, there is no attempt to accurately depict an actual Hopi kachina. Hototo is no...
  44. This is not an authetic Hopi kachina doll. It is a souvenir carving made by the Navajo (who do not have kachinas in their culture). You are unlikely to find any accurate information on the "artist."...
  45. It is a contemporary piece, made by the Tarahumara, from the Copper Canyon region of Mexico. They are hand-made, fired in an outdoor pit fire, thus the "burn marks".
  46. This is Berber pottery, from northern Algeria, made by the Kabyle women. I can't determine the age from the photos, however, since this type of pottery dates as far back as 2000B.C., and is still be...
  47. These are Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz in northern Chihuahua. Pottery has been made there only since the late 1970's, so these are by no means antique.
  48. See more

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