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  1. Not related in any way to Native American Indian art. The symbol of the eye within the hand is called the hamsa hand, and originated in the Middle East and North Africa. It is seen as a protection ...
  2. Sorry, I should have placed quotes around your mention of "Shipibo pottery from Ecuador." When I first answered, I thought you just had just mistaken the name of the tribe. The Shipibo live in ...
  3. It obviously was important enough for you to mention, specifically, Shipibo, from Ecuador, in your first post. Which indicated that you had an interest in who, specifically, made the bowls. If someo...
  4. It's not Native American, it's a traditional divination book, or "pustaha," from Indonesia. Made with pages made from bark, and in a traditional folding form, it's associated with the Batak people o...
  5. Since there is dispute about where the term "America" itself originated, (most often credited to a cartographer who assigned the term to the new land he mistakenly thought had been "discovered" by an ...
  6. It's Ashuar pottery, from Ecuador.
  7. Yes, it's African, from the Okavango region of Botswana. Similar colors as Pima and Papago coiled baskets, but they would be made from yucca. Botswana baskets like this are made from leaves of the ...
  8. The two on the left are coiled date palm fiber baskets from Pakistan. The small one on top of the larger one is a open stitched coiled yucca Tohono O'odham (formerly Papago) basket; and the large on...
  9. This isn't a guess, it's a positive identification. It isn't Native American, it's African...a traditional Zulu beaded Sangoma (healer) doll. The doll is contemporary, and one of the most popular ...
  10. I'm afraid the information you received was incorrect. This is not Seminole, or Native American. This is a Mexican basket, from the Toluca Valley of central Mexico, made for the tourist trade.
  11. Just in the interest of accuracy, there actually is a "limit" on where the pot came from...if you mean where it was made. Pottery is fired clay, and clay is unique to a specific area, as is the sour...
  12. That would be Rainbow "Yei" not "Yu." The Yei are the holy figures in the Navajo culture/religion. The Navajo are the only tribe that makes this type of sand paintings for the tourist trade. It ...
  13. This is African, a traditional Masai water or milk bottle, from Kenya.
  14. It's a contemporary import from Pakistan, made from palm fiber, with designs supposedly influenced by American Indian baskets. Decorative only, and widely available on line and in gift shops through...
  15. It's an African coiled palm fiber basket, made by the Hausa of Nigeria...dates mid-20th century.
  16. All I can tell you is that it isn't Native American, based on the fact that it has fringe on the sides. Hopefully someone who specializes in tribal rugs from other countries will see it and be able t...
  17. Once you're signed in to CW, there should be an "Add a comment or question" box at the bottom, and below that, a box to check for Email when someone comments. I think the problem may be that the "k...
  18. This is from Nepal. Here's the plain version, without the Buddah: http://tinyurl.com/h5pnytf And a box with the Buddah figure: http://tinyurl.com/jop3ujr According to most of the examples, th...
  19. Not Native American. This basket is Mexican, from the Toluca Valley region of central Mexico. If you want to confirm, see the Burke Museum's on line data base of their collection of Toluca baskets.
  20. All I can tell you is that it definitely isn't Native American. No American Indian basket makers use this particular combination of materials, weaving techniques, colors, and form. The braided handl...
  21. It's actually African, a traditional style of bread basket, from Ethiopia.
  22. No, it resembles some Indian baskets, but this is actually African, from Botswana. It's coiled from palm fiber, and is contemporary. Here's a completed liveauctioneer web page with similar example...
  23. They are illustrated in "Art of the Basket, Traditional Basketry from Around the World" by Bryan Sentance, and a similar one is featured on the front cover. Or a web search for "Hausa Basket" will sh...
  24. It's a coiled palm fiber basket from Africa, made by the Hausa tribe of Nigeria and neighboring Niger.
  25. This is a coiled palm fiber Mexican basket, from the Toluca Valley of central Mexico. Not Native American Indian. It's identified by the weaving technique, where spaces are left between the stit...
  26. The dolls are contemporary items from Peru, called a Chancay burial dolls, patterned after a pre-Columbian design. They are popular souvenir items from Peru. The basket is covered with coco fiber ...
  27. It's African, a traditional beaded panel made by the Yoruba of Nigeria. Here's a completed auction for a similar one on eBay: 141916269859
  28. It's a souvenir owl, most likely from Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico. Acoma potters also make owls, but the way it is painted, and the way the beak is formed, is more characteristic of Zuni owls. Probably ...
  29. These inexpensive souvenir items painted with poster paint were only made by two tribes, the Tesuque and the Jemez, starting in the 1930s. They were the low end of the market, and ignored and dis...
  30. Got carried away with those ( ( ) ) marks, and didn't proofread first! But wanted to get that point across. On any given day, up to 90% of the New Listings on eBay under the Native American Pottery...
  31. That's a pretty broad category, but if you want to start with pottery, the reference I always recommend is "Southwestern Pottery, Anasazi to Zuni" by Allan Hayes and John Blom. The original edition...
  32. From the buyers' reviews, apparently about 6 years old. (First review was dated October, 2010.)
  33. It's a dhurrie. Advertised simply as "imported," but likely from India or Pakistan. (Or China.) Here's a website where they were sold: http://www.sundancecatalog.com/product/diamondback+dhurr...
  34. Not Native American, since it is woven with fringe on both ends.
  35. Not Native American made, since it is woven with fringe on both ends. Could be a dhurrie, from India.
  36. Not Native American. I think it's Mexican. There were several versions of this style of pottery that appeared in decorator shops, etc., about 10-12 years ago. Colors varied, but all seemed to have ...
  37. It looks like the work of Amado Peña, a "designated artisan" of the Pascua Yaqui tribe of Arizona. He has a very stylized way of depicting faces. Check it compared to this eBay listing: 11184929258...
  38. Those distinctive shaped eyes are called "coffee bean" eyes in the trade, and are usually associated with pre-Columbian pottery from western Mexico. They are also found in a few other world cultures,...
  39. The form is called a "cantir," and it originated in Spain, but is also found in Latin America, and elsewhere where there was a Spanish heritage. There is even a museum dedicated to the pottery ca...
  40. It's a tapa cloth placemat, from the kingdom of Fiji, in the South Pacific, a popular souvenir from the islands. Tapa cloth is made from strips of the paper mulberry tree bark, pounded out thin and...
  41. No, it's African, not Native American. A bundle-coiled palm fiber basket, that resembles some Native American basketry, but is the wrong combination of materials, construction techniques, colors, an...
  42. Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico.
  43. This is a classic shape and design pattern, from Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico. Called either a pottery basket, or a "double spout pitcher," it probably dates circa 1930s. If you'd like a referen...
  44. You're right, they are early 20th century souvenir figurines from Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico. Here's a very similar frog, sold through Adobe Gallery (one of the most-reputable galleries dealing wit...
  45. The only thing I can tell you, is that it definitely isn't Native American Indian pottery....
  46. Glad to find out that wasn't a break! Everything looks right...I'd say it deserves a far better display presentation, rather than being stuck next to a factory-made Skookum doll. And if it isn'...
  47. Main thing to check for concerning the coiling, is the specific technique, if that can be determined. Yokuts baskets are traditionally "bundle" coiled, where the coil is made up of "bundle" of shor...
  48. Based solely on the photo, I would agree that it does appear to be Yokuts. (Yokuts is a pretty general category, however, and can apply to some 40 related groups in south-central California.) I do...
  49. It's a contemporary souvenir pictorial rug from Egypt. Don't try to read too much of a story from it. The weaver wanted to weave something that would attract a buyer, so put in symbols that she ...
  50. All I can tell you is that it isn't Native American, since it was thrown on a potter's wheel, which Native American potters never used.
  51. See more

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MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old