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  1. I would add that if you buy directly from the Navajo carvers themselves, they usually call their carvings "dolls" not "kachina dolls." Or just "carvings." The deception primarily occurs when th...
  2. Whether this is an authentic kachina doll, depends on who made it. Only the pueblo tribes have kachinas in their culture, and of those, only the Hopi and Zuni carve kachina dolls for sale. Nava...
  3. It's a twined Skokomish basket, from the Hood Canal region of western Washington. Here's a good article. by one of the most reputable authorities, which gives great information on how to identify W...
  4. While on the topic, you might want to add another similar item to the list of interesting oddities. Look up "oosik" . It's the walrus version.
  5. It doesn't appear to be a Native American artifact. It's like a rock concretion, often mistaken for something else.... See: http://www.desertusa.com/desert-minerals/concretions.html
  6. Just a comment on how these are made. Santa Clara and San Ildefonso traditional pottery is made from local clay (usually found right on pueblo lands) and fired traditionally...outside in a fire, no...
  7. Looks like an interpretation of the old Sandman story, sprinkling sand to bring on sleep and dreams. There are more scary versions, this one looks pretty benign.
  8. It's from Ecuador. You can do a google search for "bird images ecuador rugs" (without the " marks).
  9. It's a contemporary copy of an ancient Greek wine pitcher (oenochoe), as identified in the first post. So it probably says "made in GREECE." Maybe the writing that you can't make out is in ...
  10. It's made from stoneware clay, thrown and trimmed on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a kiln...so it would be considered studio pottery or art pottery, not Native Amrican.
  11. This is probably from Santa Clara Pueblo, rather than San Ildefonso, based on a number of these I've had over the years. Both made black-on-black pottery. Since there's little water, and no trad...
  12. This would be an "American Raku" or post-firing reduction piece, rather than traditional Japanese Raku. It's a typical piece made by a studio potter, who will likely be difficult, if not impossible...
  13. These are glass cozies, used to fit around drinking glasses, mid-1900's. Made in China, and originally sold in sets of 8. They had a small cloth tag stitched on the bottom, with "Made in China" prin...
  14. Yes, mass-produced for the decorator trade, ca. 1970's/1980's. I believe this type of ware was made in Mexico.
  15. Slip is a suspension of clay particles in water. It is usually the consistency of heavy cream. It's used to decorate pottery, and is applied to leather-hard clay, rather than to bisque ware, like ...
  16. It looks like the origin is the South Pacific. That appears to be a tropical wood. It's not a shape of boat or canoe associated with the Pacific Northwest. Even the writing looks like it is Pol...
  17. It depicts a Koyemsi, also known as a Mudhead (although neither name is what the Hopi or Zuni call them). They are a part of the pueblo culture, found at Hopi and Zuni. Technically, they are not ka...
  18. It is not Native American. The type of beads, form, and way it's constructed all point to Asia.
  19. This is not Indian, it is a Chimayo weaving, and is Hispanic. The name comes from the village of Chimayo, in northern New Mexico, which was settled in the 1600's by the Spanish, who brought their Euro...
  20. This is a cast resin souvenir copy of a grease bowl The real ones are carved cedar, and much larger. This wouldn't hold much grease!
  21. This isn't a Native American grease bowl. It's a replica, made from resin. No great value, so feel to use it for whatever.
  22. Neither, it's walrus tusk.
  23. This is Mexican, not Native American...a Saltillo from central Mexico.
  24. It's a batik stamp, used to apply the wax to the fabric.
  25. It's a popular souvenir Kwakiutl-style totem pole. with a standard stamp, saying: Genuine Indian Made Hand Carved By Chief White Eagle Although there were some Native American tribal chiefs ...
  26. I think the comment was meant as a joke. Beatrix (not Beatrice) Potter, the British author of Peter Rabbit, had no connection with pottery. He did do paintings, however, and at one time wanted to b...
  27. Neither Native American nor African. It's traditional pottery from Peru. From the area around Cusco.
  28. Forgot to add that nearly every Southwest pueblo tribe that made pottery (Hopi, Acoma, Isleta, Santo Domingo, Cochiti, Santa Clara, San Juan, and even the Papago in southern Arizona) made similar litt...
  29. Nice little Hopi pottery moccasin. These were popular souvenir items in the early-to-mid 1950's. They often were made as a pair, tied together, so that's probably what the holes were for. Or to han...
  30. It isn't Maori, or Polynesian. It's from Borneo, Indonesia, identified by those iconic carved swirls on the lower portion of the vessel. Similar to Maori, I suppose, but distinctively different.
  31. First thing to learn is, authenticity is determined by how it is woven, not by the design. If it is woven with fringes on both ends, it cannot be a Navajo weaving. The Navajo are the only Native Amer...
  32. It isn't stone, it's pottery, handmade, and Mexican. This is a black clay whistle from Oaxaca. They've been popular Mexican souvenir items for years, and come in many forms, birds being the the most...
  33. No, it isn't Washoe. The materials used, and the construction technique will help identify it. I can't tell from the photo what type of material it is. The bottom looks like it may be spruce ro...
  34. No, it isn't Washoe. Washoe basket are coiled, and made from willow. This is a twined basket, made from hazel, from north western California, most likely Hupa. Several neighboring tribes make n...
  35. Carol Namoki, listed in Gregory Schaaf's "Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies." She was active in the 1960's-1970's. "Tewa Village" is another name for Hano, one of the three villages on top...
  36. What's the yellow thing?
  37. The larger one is Yanomami, from the Amazon rainforest of Brazil or Venezuela.
  38. It's a Saltillo, from Mexico, woven on a mechanized floor loom. Saltillos take their name from the region in Mexico where this particular pattern style (colorful stripes, often with a central diamon...
  39. It's an Iroquois Vicorian "Whimsy." Like a lot of Native American crafts, this was made strictly for the tourist market. It therefore was made based on the idea of what would sell best, rather than ...
  40. Just in the interest of accuracy, pop outs are not caused by mica, they are a result of limestone in the clay. You will see a tiny white spot in the center of the pop out that is the limestone conta...
  41. It's Senufo, from the Ivory Coast/Mali region of western Africa. A modern copy of a traditional mask, made for sale, but well-done and decorative.
  42. I think that's a good estimate of age. The Hopi, unlike some of the other tribes, have always remained true to their traditional methods of pottery production, and have never resorted to the use ...
  43. Just be sure you spell it "Lewis," not "Louis"!
  44. "Hozoni" is one of the lines manufactured by Cedar Mesa Pottery factory in Blanding, Utah. The company hires Native American workers to decorate and sign the pots. It is not Native American pottery,...
  45. No, they are not Native American, they are Mexican, from the Toluca Valley. This particular type of construction, a coiled basket where the coils are joined with a wrapped stitch which separates and ...
  46. It's African, from Ethiopia...not Native American or Eskimo. This form, with the flattened-off top of the conical lid, is common on coiled Ethiopian storage baskets, as is the use of leather to rein...
  47. A pop out is just a little white "pit" on the surface of the pot, where an impurity in the clay, usually limestone, absorbs moisture and expands over time and "pops" a piece of the surface off the pot...
  48. You're kidding, right? It's Acoma, circa 1950's. If it has a lot of little "pop-outs" (white bits out of the clay) it dates to the 1960's when their clay developed a lot of impurities. Put it o...
  49. Have no idea, but it looks like an interesting item. I've never seen one like it before.
  50. They're Asian, a mixture of styles from Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, and possibly Japan. Not sure where they were made, but Indonesia would be most likely.
  51. See more

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