CanyonRoad

Collections

CanyonRoad has not created any collections yet. What are collections?

Comments

  1. It's a traditional design from Ecuador.
  2. Hope you realize that it's J.P. Ukestine, not J. Pukestine!
  3. This is contemporary studio pottery, so it may be difficult to identify the maker. The distinctive blue glaze is a barium glaze, and many potters do not use it because of toxicity issues (barium car...
  4. Recent carving from Indonesia.
  5. However, I will certainly agree that the book is a good investment! Another recommendation would be "Art of the Basket, Traditional Basketry from Around the World" by Bryan Sentance.
  6. The patterns, colors, weaving technique, and designs on baskets can all be copied by any competent basket maker. The only thing that can't, is the local materials. So that is the primary identifying...
  7. These were made by MPI Multi Products Inc, in the late 1940's/early 50's. It's a Syroco wood/resin figure of a "hungry horse" and came in a 4" size and 8". They were sold as souvenirs across the w...
  8. The clay figure with the detached head is called a Tesuque rain god, made at Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico. They were popular souvenir items in the 1910-1930's era. There's a book about them, "When Rai...
  9. It's African, not Native American. a traditional coiled basket from Ethiopia.
  10. There was a fairly well-known studio in the Seattle area in the 1980s/1990s that was making this style pottery. Can't recall the name, but someone may recognize it. I think it was actually featured ...
  11. No, not Native American, just an interesting factory-made textile, made on a commercial horizontal loom, not on an upright loom like a Native American weaving would be made on. It should make great...
  12. It isn't Navajo or Native American. No Native American tribe makes blankets. The Navajo are the only ones who make rugs, but they haven't made blankets since the 1800's. The way the edges are boun...
  13. blunderbuss2 is absolutely correct...this is an Aztec calendar design. Modern.
  14. Just from what I can see in the photos, it does not appear to have been woven on a Navajo loom. The key features that would indicate it is not authentic: 1) the single thick braided corner c...
  15. It's a Navajo Storm Pattern design, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's a Navajo rug. The only way to positively identify a Navajo rug is to determine if it was woven on an upright Navajo loom...
  16. It's traditional Berber pottery, from Morocco.
  17. It's Mexican, not Native American, from Oaxaca.
  18. Based on the subject, style, form, and colors used, I would be willing to bet that the date is actually "1980", not 1930.
  19. Just a bit of additional background. Comanche Pottery has no connection with the Comanche tribe. It is a pottery manufacturer/wholesale factory, located in Comanche, Texas. They manufacture art pot...
  20. This is a Chimayo rug. Chimayo weaving takes its name from the village of Chimayo, New Mexico, which was settled in the late 1600's by the Spanish. They brought their European looms and weaving te...
  21. I probably should have mentioned that raku pottery like this isn't related in any way to anything Native American. It's a type of pottery which is generally credited to being started by American pot...
  22. This is contemporary raku studio pottery, more correctly called "American raku" or post-firing reduction. It's low-fired, and porous, so is for decorative use only. Here's a link to a page that ex...
  23. This is contemporary Mexican pottery from Mata Ortiz, northern Chihuahua. This type of pottery was first made and came on the market in the late 1970's/1980's. The early pieces were copies of, or in...
  24. Not Native American. The Navajo are the only tribe that weaves rugs, and they use a unique type of loom and weaving technique (an upright loom and a continuous warp) which makes it impossible to weav...
  25. This is contemporary stoneware pottery, made by a studio potter, and therefore, very difficult to match with a signature. It's a vegetable steamer. These have been popular items at craft fairs, s...
  26. Your interesting folk art figures are from Ayacucho, in Peru.
  27. The teepee is made from coco bark fiber, or coconut husk. They're made in the Philippines, available from import shops and, sometimes, floral supply places.
  28. Just to clarify, for those who don't click on links, Comanche pottery is not related in any way to Comanche Indians, but gets its name from the town where it was made, Comanche, Texas. There is no do...
  29. It's an Indonesian import, that started showing up on the market about 10-15 years ago.
  30. No, not Native American. It's African, from the Sahara region, made by the Berbers of northern Africa.
  31. Just found my copy of "Navajo Pottery, Tradition I Innovations" by Hartman and Musial. It mentions on page 69 that Louise Goodman's daughter Eloise, and two sons, Eddie Jr. and Edward, all made potte...
  32. Decorative only, definitely not a working decoy.
  33. Traditionally-made Navajo wood-fired pottery, like your other piece. EG may be Eddie Goodman, husband of well-known Navajo potter Louise Goodman. I don't know for sure that he makes pottery, but I d...
  34. It's traditionally-made Navajo pottery, made from local clay, fired outdoors in a bonfire, and then coated with pinon pine pitch while it is still red-hot from the fire. While it is made in a tradi...
  35. This is Mexican, not Indian, from Tonala. It dates circa 1930's-1940's. This style is usually called "opaque Tonala" ware, and was made for only a relatively short period. It was a popular type of...
  36. No, not Native American. It's African, a camel saddle/stool from Morocco. These are popular souvenir items, found all over northern Africa (Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt).
  37. The little point in the middle is a sign that the potter was inexperienced. This is a class room project, or made by a hobby artist who just got their first potter's wheel. If you don't take a potte...
  38. True. Native American potters never used a potter's wheel, and never glazed their pottery, but early Mexican potters did, as well as most other cultures around the world.
  39. No, it's not Native American. The Navajo are the only Native American tribe that weaves rugs, and they use a unique loom and weaving technique (an upright loom with a continuous warp), which makes it...
  40. This is Mexican pottery from San Luis Potosi. This form is generally referred to as a Huastecan water jug. It dates ca. late 1890's/early 1900's.
  41. You're welcome, looks like a great example!
  42. The terms used depend on the where you are from. The easiest way to distinguish is by using the Japanese words. In Japan, this technique would be "nerikomi", as opposed to "neriage" (which it is oft...
  43. It was just your father's private joke. This isn't a peace pipe, isn't Native American. Its an antique German pipe. But if it kept the peace, it served the purpose, regardless of where it was made...
  44. The Navajo only make rugs. Period. They do not make blankets. I have no idea what other agenda you have going on. I simply saw your query about the item, and gave you a detailed, documented answ...
  45. There are no such websites, talking about "all types of Navajo fabrics," because the Navajo do not make anything but rugs, and haven't since the 1800's. Even then, they made wearing robes, not anyth...
  46. The "fabric losing threads" that you refer to is actually the top and bottom, as the piece was woven on the loom...not "both sides." The threads you see are the white warp threads (the vertical thre...
  47. G. Madelena is Genevieve Madelena, born April 26, 1931, who began making pottery in the l940's, according to Gregory Schaaf's "Southern Pueblo Pottery, 2000 Artist Biographies." Jemez Pueblo is one...
  48. Native American potters never used a potter's wheel, or glazed their pottery.
  49. It's Mexican pottery, from Oaxaca.
  50. Tapa cloth from Samoa, to be specific. called siapo in Samoa. Tapa cloth from each island group differs in the way it is made, and the patterns used, so it is possible to identify where it was made. ...
  51. See more

Loves

Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old