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  1. No, not Native American. It's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  2. The pot is from Santo (with an "o") Domingo Pueblo, but I do not know whose signature this is. Nor does it fit any of the Santo Domingo potters listed in Gregory Schaaf's "Southern Pueblo Pottery, 20...
  3. Definitely not Native American. The bone beads are from Indonesia. The silver-colored fish could be from Tibet, but most of them come from China today. They are widely available in craft se...
  4. The basket on the left is from the Philippines, the other one is African, most likely from Botswana. Both are contemporary.
  5. No, it's African, not Native American. It's made from palm fiber, which has a distinctive different look from yucca, which the only similar Native American baskets would be made from. So the fact t...
  6. Mexican, from the Toluca Valley region.
  7. Nope, no mixture of cultures here. It is African, from Botswana. Positively. Anyone truly familiar with African baskets should be able to recognize it immediately. It has the iconic flaring f...
  8. No, not Native American. It's African, most likely made by the Hausa of Nigeria.
  9. Right, not Native American. It's a twined Yanomami burden basket from the Amazon region of Brazil and Venezuela. Here's a web site to confirm: http://www.arte-amazonia.com/shop/amazon-baskets/yan...
  10. Sorry, but it's not Native American. Where something was purchased may have nothing to do with where it was made. This, for example, is a split bamboo sewing basket, from China. They must have...
  11. The first one appears to be a North-western California basket cap (would need a photo of the part that's resting on the table to confirm it's a cap...it would have decorative elements in three distin...
  12. It's a ceramic insulator, from a power line.
  13. This isn't Native American. It's a Chimayo weaving, from the area around Chimayo, New Mexico. There is no tribal affiliation. The weavers are all descendants of the early Spanish settlers in th...
  14. You can tell by the way the antler pieces have been sliced off and drilled, that they are new, and show absolutely no wear. The beads are also new, available in bead shops and craft supply stores. ...
  15. Possibly Leo Yazzie, active 1975-present, listed in Gregory Schaaf's "American Indian Jewelry I, 1200 Artist Biographies."
  16. No, not Native American. It's African, from Botswana.
  17. It's Hualapai, (pronounced, and sometimes spelled "Walapai," from the Grand Canyon region of Arizona. It's a twined basket, made for sale to tourists and collectors, and is one of the most common for...
  18. The three masks you have posted fit more into the decorator category, than actual African masks. As such, they may have been made in a country other than the one where the original mask that they res...
  19. It's very attractive, but I'd say it's unlikely that this is Native American, since it's marked 925. Very few Native Americans use that marking, because it's usually associated with Mexican jewelry...
  20. Not American Indian. It's Mexican, a distinctive style made in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico, and popular souvenir items for years. If you want to confirm, here is a link to the Universit...
  21. It does resemble pottery, but it isn't. This is actually a soapstone bowl, from Africa. Usually marketed as "Kisii soapstone," a wide variety of items are made in the Kisii district of Kenya. H...
  22. All I can tell you is that it definitely isn't Native American Indian, since it was thrown and decorated on a potter's wheel, and has that metal band around the neck. Black clay pottery is made in ...
  23. The Chinese have been flooding the U.S. market with pottery that looks like studio pottery. I've heard they have actually gone to U.S. craft fairs and purchased items from the potters, to take back t...
  24. No, not Native American. The pot is Tarahumara, from Mexico. Someone probably added the fetishes and feathers, hoping to pass this off as Native American Indian, but no American Indian tribe makes a...
  25. This type of scratched in signature is almost always an indication of hobby or student work, regardless of how interesting the pot is or the type of glaze used. The right glaze can make up for a lot ...
  26. This is known as an amate painting, a folk art from Mexico. It is done on a type of paper made from the bark of the ficus tree. The name comes from the Nahuatl "amatl" which means "paper." The proc...
  27. Sorry, but this isn't an antique decoy. It's a "decorative" decoy made in, most likely, Indonesia...and made to have an antique look. The whole thing was painted, and then all the rough edges of the...
  28. I agree, Tarahumara. Sorry for the hasty conclusion. I at least can blame it on attempting to respond from a hospital bed, based on the small photo on my phone...and a cloudy mind from surgery and d...
  29. Not Native American, no Native American Indian tribe makes anything like this style of pottery. Colors, maybe, like orange/black/white, are similar to those used by some southwest tribes. But this ...
  30. It's African, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria or neighboring Niger.
  31. Your thought was correct...Guatemala.
  32. The basket was most likely a recent gift or purchase when your grandmother was using it in her 80s. It doesn't date earlier than the 1970s. It is African, from the Bolgatanga region of Ghana. Com...
  33. This is a poster paint pot from Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico. Two tribes, Tesuque and Jemez, made similar inexpensive souvenir items, decorated with poster paint (and later acrylic paint, when it beca...
  34. Whether or not something is Native American is not determined by the symbols or decoration on the object, but rather by the material used, the method of construction, the form itself, and, most import...
  35. Not related in any way to Native American Indian art. The symbol of the eye within the hand is called the hamsa hand, and originated in the Middle East and North Africa. It is seen as a protection ...
  36. Sorry, I should have placed quotes around your mention of "Shipibo pottery from Ecuador." When I first answered, I thought you just had just mistaken the name of the tribe. The Shipibo live in ...
  37. It obviously was important enough for you to mention, specifically, Shipibo, from Ecuador, in your first post. Which indicated that you had an interest in who, specifically, made the bowls. If someo...
  38. It's not Native American, it's a traditional divination book, or "pustaha," from Indonesia. Made with pages made from bark, and in a traditional folding form, it's associated with the Batak people o...
  39. Since there is dispute about where the term "America" itself originated, (most often credited to a cartographer who assigned the term to the new land he mistakenly thought had been "discovered" by an ...
  40. It's Ashuar pottery, from Ecuador.
  41. Yes, it's African, from the Okavango region of Botswana. Similar colors as Pima and Papago coiled baskets, but they would be made from yucca. Botswana baskets like this are made from leaves of the ...
  42. The two on the left are coiled date palm fiber baskets from Pakistan. The small one on top of the larger one is a open stitched coiled yucca Tohono O'odham (formerly Papago) basket; and the large on...
  43. This isn't a guess, it's a positive identification. It isn't Native American, it's African...a traditional Zulu beaded Sangoma (healer) doll. The doll is contemporary, and one of the most popular ...
  44. I'm afraid the information you received was incorrect. This is not Seminole, or Native American. This is a Mexican basket, from the Toluca Valley of central Mexico, made for the tourist trade.
  45. That would be Rainbow "Yei" not "Yu." The Yei are the holy figures in the Navajo culture/religion. The Navajo are the only tribe that makes this type of sand paintings for the tourist trade. It ...
  46. This is African, a traditional Masai water or milk bottle, from Kenya.
  47. It's a contemporary import from Pakistan, made from palm fiber, with designs supposedly influenced by American Indian baskets. Decorative only, and widely available on line and in gift shops through...
  48. It's an African coiled palm fiber basket, made by the Hausa of Nigeria...dates mid-20th century.
  49. All I can tell you is that it isn't Native American, based on the fact that it has fringe on the sides. Hopefully someone who specializes in tribal rugs from other countries will see it and be able t...
  50. Once you're signed in to CW, there should be an "Add a comment or question" box at the bottom, and below that, a box to check for Email when someone comments. I think the problem may be that the "k...
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MYSTERY HEAD POT. Wooden Smoking Dog Pipe Maine  Sea Urchin Basket, 1890-1910 Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old