CanyonRoad

Collections

CanyonRoad has not created any collections yet. What are collections?

Comments

  1. Tonala or Tlaquepaque tourist ware (it's often impossible to tell which, since they same type is made in both towns) from the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Probably mid-20th century. Similar pieces are ...
  2. No, not Native American. It's either studio pottery, or an art class project, made from a commercial stoneware clay, and fired in a gas kiln.
  3. The pattern is that of a Navajo Third Phase Chief's blanket. They were a main trade item for the Navajo in the 1860-1880 time period. Be aware, however, that the pattern itself has been woven a...
  4. No, not actually from Bohemia. (I think that was just a comment on the possible lifestyle, as in an unconventional, bohemian, "arty" style that the person in the link thought applied.) The basket ...
  5. Whoever attributed these to the "Hop Hop" tribe was either pulling your leg, or completely ignorant. There is no such thing as a "Hop Hop" tribe! I agree, manufactured clay marbles, not Native Ame...
  6. It's a Mexican textile, not Native American, and called a Texcoco, after the region in Mexico where it originated. The identifying features are a central diamond pattern, surrounded by a band con...
  7. The shorter one, with the round head, is African, an akuaba, a traditional fertility doll made by the Ashanti people of Ghana. Which piece was identified as "Taino"? There are some people in Puert...
  8. It's African, a traditional beaded strip made by the Yoruba, of Nigeria. (With cowrie shells around the edge.)
  9. Cute little angel, but this is just an angel figurine, not a "storyteller." By definition, a storyteller is a figure surrounded by smaller, "younger" figures, to whom the stories are being told. In ...
  10. They both appear to be 1950s or earlier coiled willow baskets, made by the Papago (Tohono O'odham) from southern Arizona.
  11. Not Indian, it's a traditional Chinese storage jar, wrapped in bamboo. It's stoneware, thrown on a potter's wheel, glazed, and fired in a kiln...none of which is true of Native American pottery. The...
  12. First, Navajo rugs are woven on an upright loom, with a continuous warp, which means they cannot be woven with fringe on both ends. The fringe, however, can be woven back into the body of the rug, ...
  13. The bowl is signed D Tosa (probably Danielle, active 1990 to present), from Jemez Pueblo, N.M. Can't read the other one, either. Looks like perhaps they meant to write "Navajo" but made a "u" inst...
  14. It's Mexican, called a Texcoco, after the region where this classic design originated. They always have a band containing the iconic "S" or "5" pattern, surrounding a central pattern, usually a diam...
  15. It's Maricopa, or Pima, from southern Arizona. Two separate, independent tribes and cultures, but their pottery looks virtually identical. Since the Maricopa had two "revivals" of making pottery, an...
  16. The orange, green, and yellow combination used here is not typical of any Native American Indian traditional bead work. And one can't assume that the "Lakota star" design necessarily means that ...
  17. This was made on a bead loom, and is not associated with any specific tribe. Traditional Indian beadwork was stitched and sewn, not woven on a bead loom. This type of craft was popular in summer ca...
  18. The definitive reference is "The Myth And Magic Of Nemadji Indian Pottery" by Michelle D. Lee, which will answer any questions one may have about this pottery. The idea that Nemadji pottery is Ind...
  19. It isn't Native American, it's from Lombok, Indonesia. They were popular imports in the 1930s era, and often used, as mentioned, as props in plays and movies involving "snake charmers." It's singl...
  20. 1960s hippie gear, based on the purple lining, machine stitching, and what appears to be a snap closure.
  21. Yes, Saint Anthony of Padua, in charge of finding lost items.
  22. It's African, from Upper Volta. The holes around the edge are for attaching either the fabric or raffia/cordage, that helps conceal the dancer. Probably a modern piece, made for sale, but based on...
  23. Thank you for helping to get the word out! I'm sure there are a lot of people who have purchased this type of pottery, thinking it is Native American, and sellers who are re-selling it as Native Amer...
  24. Sorry, but this is not Native American pottery. It was made by the Desert Pueblo Pottery Company, a factory in Phoenix, Arizona. They make souvenir gift ware with a "southwest" or "Indian" theme or mo...
  25. They may have been purchased in Bali, but they are actually from Lombok, Indonesia. Popular tourist items based on Lombok ancestor figures.
  26. It's authentic, but it's an authentic contemporary African basket, made by the Hausa, of Nigeria.
  27. The warp is the underlying white (in this case) yarn, the ends of which become the fringe. Weft is the yarn that covers the warp, and is the visible, colored yarn that makes up the pattern. I woul...
  28. Based on the way it is woven, it is not Native American, and the thickness indicates it was probably meant as a rug, rather than a blanket or robe. Really need to see it laying out flat, and a...
  29. No, Anasazi (now called Ancestral Puebloan) pottery was a gray/white clay with black decoration.
  30. Not Native American, nor a Hudson Bay blanket, as the weaving technique is wrong for both, and neither would have a center seam like this.
  31. The clay doesn't look like that used by any of the southwest pueblos, plus the fact that it is burnished (it does look like it's burnished, rather than glazed) and decorated on the bottom, point to it...
  32. No, not Native American. It's African, a coiled palm fiber basket from Botswana.
  33. Not Hupa, since Hupa baskets are twined, and made from hazel shoots, and this is a coiled basket.
  34. It's a popular souvenir item, made in Lombok, Indonesia. Also sold through import and ethnic shops. They've been made for years, changing somewhat from time to time to "update" the image, but all fe...
  35. I can positively identify this. It is African, made by the Bedouin of Morocco. It does look similar to some southwest Indian pottery, but the clay is different, the design patterns are different (th...
  36. It's African, not Native American. Made from palm fiber. The colors used, and the design patterns, indicate it's most likely from Uganda.
  37. Not from any modern Indian Pueblo tribe. Could be older, or could be a contemporary Mexican piece, that looks old. This is such a "generic" type, that without knowing where it was found, or without ...
  38. Not southwest pueblo Indian. The only pueblos that make black pottery are Santa Clara, San Ildefonso, Santo Domingo, and none of them have ever made this style of pottery. (San Juan Pueblo potters u...
  39. It's African, but not made from sisal. This is a coiled palm fiber basket, made by the Hausa, from Nigeria. Illustrated on page 145 of "Art of the Basket, Traditional Basketry from Around the World...
  40. It's a post-firing reduction piece, also called "American raku," which differs from traditional Japanese raku. American raku is credited to Paul Soldner, who developed the technique in the 1960s. ...
  41. Not a vase, it's a hanging hummingbird feeder, missing its stopper and feeding tube. You can get replacements, just search online or on eBay for "hummingbird feeder stopper." You could probably find...
  42. I agree, not old, and most likely half of a salad serving set...missing the fork. More "decorative" than functional. That tied on handle design would never stand up to repeated daily use.
  43. The spoon is made from a coconut shell, and the handle is also a tropical wood, can't tell from the photo exactly what, possibly a type of palm.
  44. A. Sisneros was the signature of Adeladie Silva Sisneros, listed in Gregory Schaaf's "Pueblo Indian Pottery, 750 Artist Biographies" as active from "1935- ?" (It also says she was best known for her...
  45. The only thing I can tell you, for sure, is that it isn't Native American. There is no tribe that makes baskets with this particular combination of material, weaving technique, form, and painted desi...
  46. Ted Francis, Jr. is listed in Gregory Schaaf's book "Hopi Katsina, 1600 Artist Biographies," as is his father, Ted Francis Sr. But since it says that the Long Hair Kachina is one of Ted Jr.'s favoite...
  47. No, not San Ildefonso, or Native American Indian. It's Mexican, from the village of Mata Ortiz, in northern Chihuahua. There is a well-known Mata Ortiz potter named Martin Olivas, which is probabl...
  48. Paul Jones is Navajo, so although the style resembles Zuni work, it is actually Navajo. The mark "P. Jones, Sterling" is listed in Barton Wright's "Hallmarks of the Southwest" and identified as t...
  49. I'd say probably no more than 20 years old. Chinese basket makers were one of the first to use a type of resin to coat their baskets, and it is a technique used all over the world. The mate...
  50. They are copies, made for export, of traditional Chinese baskets.
  51. See more

Loves

Korean Vase? Ocumicho Devil and Muerte Playing in a Band Hand Carved Wooden Swallow & Nest: Old