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Polychrome Shipibo Conibo pottery Bowl Peru Amazon Indian

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Pottery4471 of 11403Made in Italy small ceramicPottery Goblets - Signed Marty Morgan
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    Posted 5 years ago

    aehudsons
    (24 items)

    I have had this bowl for several years and think it's wonderful. This bowl measures 7 1/2" in diameter. It is painted on the inside and exterior. I believe it is from the 1940s.

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    Comments

    1. CanyonRoad, 5 years ago
      It's Shipibo, from the Amazon region of Peru. Although they have made plain, undecorated utilitarian pottery for years, this type of decorated ware, made for the collector and souvenir market, was first produced in the 1940s, and is still made today.

      The distinctive maze-like pattern is based on traditional textile patterns, and is the main identifying feature of Shipibo pottery.
    2. ho2cultcha ho2cultcha, 5 years ago
      This could be Shipibo from Ecuador or Brazil as well as Peru. I'm curious why this piece is considered 'Native American', when i call Mexican pieces made by indigenous people "Native American', it gets changed on me?
    3. CanyonRoad, 5 years ago
      It isn't Native American. The OP thought it "appears to be Native American," but it is actually Shipibo. There are several sub-groups of the Shipibo, living in the Amazon rainforest of Peru, Ecuador, and Brazil. The group living in Peru, the Shipibo Conibo, is the one that makes this style of pottery.

    4. Deano Deano, 5 years ago
      Great comments Canyon. Thanks for the knowledge.
    5. ho2cultcha ho2cultcha, 5 years ago
      it looks exactly like some of the pottery i've seen made by the Shipibo in Ecuador. i know that some of these people would also say that they are Native American, despite the legal definitions.
    6. aehudsons aehudsons, 5 years ago
      Thank you everybody for all the great information. Always good to put a name to a face.
    7. CanyonRoad, 5 years ago
      "I know that some of these people would also say that they are Native American, despite the legal definitions."

      Exactly why the law was enacted. The federal Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 is a law designed to protect the livelihood of craftspeople who are enrolled members of federally-recognized U.S. tribes, from potential loss of income and cultural heritage due to imports and non-Indian made items being sold as "Native American." It is also a truth-in-advertising law and significant consumer protection legislation.

      Anyone is still free to self-identify as whatever they please, and to call themselves Native Americans if they want. They just can't sell any item they make as "Native American" or "Indian" or from a specific tribe, unless they are enrolled members of an official U. S. tribe.

      An since most items that show up here eventually may end up being sold (or similar items, belonging to those people who use this forum to help identify things they own) it's best if the item is identified correctly, and in compliance with the law, from the start.
    8. ho2cultcha ho2cultcha, 1 year ago
      this is how the dictionary defines Native American: Na·tive A·mer·i·can
      /?n?div ??mer?k?n/
      noun
      a member of any of the indigenous peoples of North, Central, and South America.
      adjective
      relating to Native Americans.
    9. CanyonRoad, 1 year ago
      As was pointed out already, when items are offered for sale, the legal definition of Native American, given in the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, is what is applied.

      A dictionary definition is perfectly acceptable in applying to how a person identifies themself, or in written material about cultures, but it wouldn't hold up in court.

      And the way to prevent it ending up in court, if one is identifying an item which will be offered for sale (which most items are, eventually), is to use the legally-accepted term when it comes to Native American arts and crafts

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