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1919 Time Stamp.

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Clocks696 of 3416Seth Thomas Kitchen Clock8 day 2 weight german vienna regulator #2
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    Posted 3 years ago

    SpiritBear
    (813 items)

    This one is from later 1919 to early 1920 as they are mostly seen with a 1920 patent also listed on them, whereas this one has only the 1919 patent and "Other Patents Pending" on it.

    Missing actual stamp.

    I've gotten it to run quite accurately. I last adjusted time/speed 5 days ago. Currently, it is only a minute off (running fast, partially corrected by how it stops with every wind).
    An 'accurate' mechanical non-quartz clock is one that is off by a minute or less every day. To correct the offness, most came with a feature that let you adjust their speed. I will adjust it a few more times and settle with what comes of it.
    I like old clocks because they were put together by hand. Smaller ones are even cooler to me, because they were so difficult to make.

    A great little clock even as it sits. I will continue to use it. To be honest, it runs more accurately than any of my other antique clocks.

    Comments

    1. fortapache fortapache, 3 years ago
      Very cool clock.
    2. Bruce99 Bruce99, 3 years ago
      Nice SpiritBear. Thanks for sharing it with us. I've been told that an acceptable error rate for a mass produced mechanical clock is around 3 minutes plus or minus in 1 week (for an 8-day movement). Your timestamp clock must use some type of balance wheel or platform movement. They can be very accurate although a well made and adjusted pendulum regulated movement can achieve accuracy to within 1 minute per week. High-end, weight powered Regulators can do much better than that. Depending upon the condition of the mainsprings, one might have to adjust it to run slightly fast after a full wind in anticipation of it running a little slow as the week comes to an end.
    3. SpiritBear, 3 years ago
      Fort Apache, thank you.

      Bruce, thank you for viewing. It uses a balance wheel. Most of my clocks do. I've read up a little on weight- and spring-driven clocks.

      This one runs about 20 hours on a wind, which is longer than expected.

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