Mission-style furniture grew out the turn-of-the-century Arts and Crafts movement, which like Art Nouveau was a response to industrialization. During the Victorian Era, elaborate Rococo and Neoclassical furniture was churned out by factories. Artists, designers, scholars, and other thinkers of the day began to express disdain for both the frilly, ornate aesthetic of Victorian decor, as well as the low quality of machine-made items.

The lead thinkers of the Arts and Crafts movement, such as art critic John Ruskin and designer William Morris, both from England, called for a return to high-quality, hand-made furniture, crafted by artisans. They promoted a simpler, more natural, and more functional look, with clean lines and solid, heavy frames made of wood. They believed that furniture design should lack clutter and highlight the craftsmanship of the construction and the natural beauty of the materials.

In 1900, furniture designer Gustav Stickley, publisher of the influential magazine, “The Craftsman,” popularized this movement in the United States, launching his own Mission or Craftsman-style of furniture. Said to be based on the spartan furnishings of California’s Franciscan missions, the earthy, rectilinear style was characterized by thick lines of oak, with exposed mortise-and-tenon joints and little in the way of decorative carving.

The best examples of antique Mission-style furnishings, from chairs to tables to cabinets, often feature rows of narrow wooden spindles that create eye-pleasing parallel lines. The wood is varnished but never painted, and the upholstery is always of a natural, unembellished material such as dyed leather or canvas.

The great irony of Mission-style furniture is that even though the Arts and Crafts movement supposedly rejected mechanization, Stickley would used steam-powered or electric woodworking machines to get the wood ready for his pieces, which would then be hand-finished by his artisans. Eventually, the Mission style was mass-produced just like its predecessors had been, and low-quality, slipshod items were soon found everywhere.


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Recent News: Mission Style Furniture

Source: Google News

CIF state wrestling championships: Gilroy's Alex Felix finishes third at 132 ...
Contra Costa Times, March 7th

Felix was 6-1 in the tournament, with his only loss by one point (3-2) to Mission Oak-Tulare's Jaden Enriquez in the semifinals. He was the highest South Bay placer Saturday at Rabobank Arena, but six other area wrestlers also placed in the top eight...Read more

Asheville takes spotlight as Arts & Crafts capital
Asheville Citizen-Times, February 15th

At that first conference in 1988, there were 40 exhibitors of Art & Craft pottery, tiles and the signature Mission Oak furniture made by Stickley and other masters that provided the Grove Park Inn with its furnishings. There was only one contemporary...Read more

Different, new, tried 'n true
Quad City Times, February 1st

Stickley is a New York-based company named after the Stickley brothers, who made high-quality wood furniture in Mission Oak designs in the early 1900s. Knilans' is celebrating its 60th year of business this year. "We have a long history of being a ...Read more

Aminy Audi on leadership: How leaders can measure their success as they go ...
Syracuse.com, January 18th

Aminy I. Audi is CEO and chairman of the board of L. & J.G. Stickley, the family-owned furniture manufacturer headquartered in Manlius. She grew up in Lebanon and met her late husband, Alfred, when he was visiting relatives. They married in the First ...Read more

Go Knoxville's fun things to do
Knoxville News Sentinel, January 16th

Stickley Furniture, of Manlius, N.Y., was founded in the early 1900s by Gustav Stickley and his brothers and is best known for their classic Mission oak designs and outstanding craftsmanship. Danial will share a brief history of the Arts & Crafts...Read more

The Lookout: Amesbury girl stars in 'Velveteen Rabbit'
The Daily News of Newburyport, December 4th

Bill Gette/Courtesy photoThis image of a volcanic crater on Heimaey Island, Iceland, is one of many that will be shared during a slide program and lecture at the Joppa Flats Education Center on Wednesday...Read more

Property of the Week: Assembly Inn renovations
Asheville Citizen-Times, October 10th

A new ceiling updates the look in the lobby. Existing furniture was reupholstered locally. The stairwell connecting the check-in desk to the main lobby now has Mission oak stair rails and newel posts. Quarter-sawn oak paneling replaces an iron rail at...Read more

Create a peaceful nook with right fabric, colors
Chicago Daily Herald, October 5th

Throughout this month, Toms-Price is displaying a copy of the chair that Stickley, known from early in the 20th century for its simply styled Mission oak furniture, designed when the world's most famous Buddhist leader visited Colgate University in New...Read more