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A 1907 DOUBLE EXPOSURE ON PURPOSE, DONE AT HOME...IS IT?

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betweenthelens's loves771 of 1685Vintage Bronze Chinese RabbitVintage Postcard, A Little different in Silhouette with  Hand-painted lanterns, flowers ,her dress  & hairband. 1920ish
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    Posted 4 years ago

    PostCardCo…
    (437 items)

    I bought this real photo postcard,postmarked 1907 from a dealer who said it HAD TO BE an intentional experiment with a home camera, and a sort of success producing a DOUBLE EXPOSURE. Can a camera man tell me IF this actually appears to be what she said?? I wonder, if so,--how they managed it.? Could it have been done on a vintage Kodak Brownie?? However it happened---I for one am glad that it did.

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    Comments

    1. jscott0363 jscott0363, 4 years ago
      This is such a great postcard!!!
    2. PostCardCollector PostCardCollector, 4 years ago
      DOUBLE EXPOSURE ON PURPOSE? OR A MISTAKE,Read description please.
    3. betweenthelens betweenthelens, 4 years ago
      I've not seen anything like this from the early 1900s as the postmark attests to. I am sure you know (but I am mentioning this as a point of interest for others who may not know) that aside from the postmark, one can tell that this is early as the postcard is not the divided Winsch-back and the space at the bottom of the front of the card is where the text is written.
    4. betweenthelens betweenthelens, 4 years ago
      PS It looks intentional to me.
    5. PostCardCollector PostCardCollector, 4 years ago
      Thanks betweenthelens! Yep. I know the undivided backs start about 1905. but i don't know when the line did come in. Do you? I can see it was glued down at some time. I cannot make out the state it was sent to, but it was mailed from Illinois. I see "IL" Why it was postmaked 2 times is odd, but I do see that sometimes. I as well have never seen a trial shot like this. I suppose it isn't rare, and maybe done MUCH earlier in a studio. I collect old photos and have albums full, but nothing matching this. That little boy is a beautiful toddler, isn't he!
    6. SpiritBear, 4 years ago
      But it couldn't be a home camera. It's before a staged backdrop which normal people wouldn't poses. I'd not suggest it were accidental, but, rather, an option given by the photographer. As for being double-postmarked, it probably passed through more than one town, in which they postmarked it as well.
    7. rniederman rniederman, 4 years ago
      This is an intentional double exposure. There is a rectangular band running down the center of the image that is lighter than the left and right sides. This is the area where the two exposures overlapped ... a really well done exposure would have a minimal overlap if done on a proper view camera with a shifting back because there would be registration hardware on the camera.

      Anyhow, the picture is lighter where the images overlap because the exposure value is doubled (causing over-exposure) in that specific rectangular area. The left half of image (standing child) ends where the light band becomes dark on the right side. And vice versa for the right half of the image (sitting child). The left edge of the overlap is subtle but it's there slicing through the standing child's forehead.

      Dressing the child in light colored clothing conceals what would be a slight transparency showing the background. This is because, in a negative, printed highlights are in areas where silver development is densest (darkest).

      However this can be done in a roll film camera. I've done double exposures on 120 roll film with a Bronica GS1 6x7 medium format camera and early 1900s Kodak Panoram No.1. The challenge is knowing how far to wind the film to get a minimal overlap.

      What is the size of the image area (not including the white border areas)? It would help me understand if this could have been done on roll film or sheet film. Regardless, both types were widely available in the early 1900s.

      FWIW ... there is a backdrop behind the child. You can see the weighted seam where it meets the floor.
    8. betweenthelens betweenthelens, 4 years ago
      Lois, yes, a beautiful child. According to the website emotionscards.com, divided backs appeared in 1902 in England, 1904 in France, 1905 in Germany, and 1907 in the U.S.

      The postmark on the right is for certain a Washington one, and I can see Ritzville, Washington on the postcard in the address area.
      I am fascinated by all of the information imparted by rniederman. This has been a real learning experience!
    9. betweenthelens betweenthelens, 4 years ago
      Lois, yes, a beautiful child. According to the website emotionscards.com, divided backs appeared in 1902 in England, 1904 in France, 1905 in Germany, and 1907 in the U.S.

      The postmark on the right is for certain a Washington one, and I can see Ritzville, Washington on the postcard in the address area.

      I am fascinated by all of the information imparted by rniederman. This has been a real learning experience!
    10. PostCardCollector PostCardCollector, 4 years ago
      rniederman,

      I appreciate your help very much.
      I measure 4 1/8 size of the image itself. Sent a special message to you with ruler and photo--but HOLDING the ruler and photo myself, exactly 4 and 1/8th
      Also vintage home camera photos with simulated "backgrounds".. Over there I love that woven tapestry or bed covering!!Cheers for you! Lois
    11. PostCardCollector PostCardCollector, 4 years ago
      Thanks to the "lovers" of this odd photo.
      Collectomaniac loves this.
      ManikinManikin loves this.
      fortapachefortapache loves this.
      TassieDevil
      AnnaB
      SpiritBear
      AdeleC
      betweenthelens
      jscott0363

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