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Ambrotype of early American Colonist

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Posted 1 year ago

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scottvez
(686 items)

A recent purchase of mine.

The subject has his headstone and family information posted on the "Find a Grave" website. Available information indicates he was born in 1768, dating this image to 1858.

It amazes me to see a documented image of a man of this age. I find it interesting to speculate on what he could have witnessed as a child and young man growing up in Mass. As a child, he lived through (and was most likely personally impacted by) the American Revolution. He lived to see the start of the Civil War, dying in 1863 at the age of 95.

I have seen and owned CDV images of folks who lived through the American Revolution, but this is the first hard image I have been able to acquire. It is also the first image that I have seen with the Identifying sign.

At the time of the image, there were several efforts in the NE to photographically document the surviving Colonist; this may have been part of one of those projects.

scott

Comments

  1. Poop Poop, 1 year ago
    Good old Massachusetts, proud to live here!
  2. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks for looking and commenting p... .

    For those not familiar with Mass, Reading is just North of Boston.

    Here is a link to the "Find a Grave" site on Bancroft:

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=68329622

    scott
  3. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks for looking gargoyle and tony!

    scott
  4. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks much for looking vetraio!

    scott
  5. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Now, where is Boston? Joking. We all know it is N. of Atlanta. What a fascinating time span to have lived thru!
  6. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks for looking buss.

    scott
  7. AmberRose AmberRose, 1 year ago
    Scott, you find the most interesting photographs. Really found this one interesting.
    Thank you for sharing.
  8. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks amber-- I spend a good bit of time searching antique photograph groups for desirable examples. For every one that I find desirable and purchase, I probably look at a thousand or more!

    This is the first time that I have seen an example like this.

    scott
  9. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks rob!

    scott
  10. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Of course the guy probably wasn't involved, but just think of the history that happened while he was alive. He may have been in the Revolutionary War, Whisky Rebellion, Creek Wars, War of 1812 & other historical experiences. His life was during so many interesting events that it boggles my mind. I guess ours have also, but this is true colonial history.
  11. filmnet filmnet, 1 year ago
    Scott, Reading town is 10 Min's from my town, south of Beverly. Here is the town website Reading played an active role in the American Revolutionary War. Minute Men were prominently involved in the engagements pursuing the retreating British Red Coats after the skirmish at Concord Bridge. Dr. John Brooks, Captain of the "Fourth Company of Minute" remained in the army for eight years of distinguished service, including White Plains and Valley Forge. He later became the ninth governor of Massachusetts. Only one Reading soldier was killed in action during the Revolution. Joshua Eaton died in the battle of Saratoga in 1777.

    Reading played an active role in the American Revolutionary War. Minute Men were prominently involved in the engagements pursuing the retreating British Red Coats after the skirmish at Concord Bridge. Dr. John Brooks, Captain of the "Fourth Company of Minute" remained in the army for eight years of distinguished service, including White Plains and Valley Forge. He later became the ninth governor of Massachusetts. Only one Reading soldier was killed in action during the Revolution. Joshua Eaton died in the battle of Saratoga in 1777.
  12. filmnet filmnet, 1 year ago
    http://www.ci.reading.ma.us/pages/readingma_webdocs/townhistory
    Here is the house he may have been in


    http://heritage.noblenet.org/exhibits/show/reading-public-library/walkable-reading/item/7585
  13. blunderbuss2 blunderbuss2, 1 year ago
    Great reading filmnet. Thanks for sharing. Maybe it's not too late to surrender to the Brits? Just long enough for them to pay off the nat'l debt.
  14. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Great family information filmnet.

    There is a definite connection-- I spent a little time trying to sort through the family tree.

    "The next son Nehemiah, settled on the Abraham Foster place on Grove Street and for many years ran the saw mill, known later as the Slab City Mill. He married Sussannah Beard and their daughter Eliza married Capt Charles Parker, a later owner of the red house on Pearl Street." (From Descendants of William Bancroft: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/c/b/Karen-I-Mcbain/BOOK-0001/0001-0029.html ).

    scott


  15. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Here is a fascinating story on images of Revolutionary War veterans:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2356524/Faces-American-revolution-Amazing-early-photographs-document-heroes-War-Independence-later-years.html

    scott
  16. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks pw!

    scott
  17. PaperHoarder, 1 year ago
    I am not sure if you have found this info already but his father, Joseph Bancroft, was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War.
  18. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    No, I wasn't aware paper-- thanks for the information.

    scott
  19. PaperHoarder, 1 year ago
    You're welcome. According to an online source he was a sergeant at Lexington as well as a shoe maker.
  20. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks-- what is the source? Can you post a link if it isn't a pay site?

    scott
  21. PaperHoarder, 1 year ago
    http://www.temple-genealogy.com/b200.htm
  22. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks much, I appreciate it!

    scott
  23. PaperHoarder, 1 year ago
    You're welcome Scott. You have many amazing items posted on here and this is exactly the kind of item that I would collect.
  24. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks paper, glad that you have found some of my postings of interest.

    scott
  25. AmberRose AmberRose, 1 year ago
    The time and attention you spend has obviously resonated with the CW team. I really enjoy when so much information is sparked by a treasure.
  26. filmnet filmnet, 1 year ago
    Thanks all Its so easy here around Boston, the towns here have history websites, and some have houses from 1700s.
    All town has a old Historical Society my wife's family have gave them old stuff from the 1860s. They have a house from 1630s here and in Salem had really old Historical Society, which after all these years are gone. But all is in 2 Library's here.
    http://www.beverlyhistory.org/houses/balch.html
    http://www.pem.org/
    http://www.pem.org/library/
    http://www.noblenet.org/salem/library/history.html

  27. filmnet filmnet, 1 year ago
    Here is all the old shot of the men, Scott I saw this on Time website last month.http://lightbox.time.com/2013/07/03/faces-of-the-american-revolution/?iid=lb-gal-viewagn#1
  28. filmnet filmnet, 1 year ago
    http://www.http://lightbox.time.com/2013/07/03/faces-of-the-american-revolution/?iid=lb-gal-viewagn#1
  29. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks again, mike!

    scott
  30. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Image arrived today-- it turned out to be a quarter plate ruby ambrotype.

    I was surprised at the size as I thought it was a sixth plate. The seller didn't advertise the size of the image.

    For those not familiar, bigger is better with antique "hard images".

    scott
  31. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks for looking moonstone!

    scott
  32. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks matty, david, musik and bratjdd!

    scott
  33. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    I spent some additional time looking through the links provided and I owe a BIG THANKS to filmnet (post 12) and the link to the house.

    The house was built by Nehemiah's grandfather (Thomas, referred to as JR but noted as IV in other accounts). Nehemiah's father Joseph inherited half of the house (North end and East of the celler)-- his Uncle Moses received the other half. Moses moved from the house between 1753 and 1756 leaving the house to Joseph. No mention is made of Joseph's departure from the house.

    So it appears that Nehemiah knew the house very well and there is even the strong possibility that he was BORN IN THE HOUSE!

    Thanks again for the great link film.

    Here is the link again:

    http://heritage.noblenet.org/exhibits/show/reading-public-library/walkable-reading/item/7585

    scott
  34. scottvez scottvez, 1 year ago
    Thanks for looking budek!

    scott
  35. scottvez scottvez, 12 months ago
    Thanks lansing!

    scott
  36. scottvez scottvez, 12 months ago
    Thanks for looking buss-- Best of wishes for 2014!

    scott

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