Chrisnp

United States

Militaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1920, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm alsoMilitaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1920, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm also acquiring a collection of WWI British Army line infantry other ranks cap badges. Another aspect of my collecting is the acquisition of firearms and accessories from this ’61 to ’19 era. I’m a retired Army Warrant Officer with a lifelong interest in the lives of soldiers of the past, and the items they used and wore. I’ve been collecting militaria for about 40 years now, and enjoy sharing what I’ve learned as well as continuing to learn from others. (Read more)

Posts

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US Army Model 1884 Enlisted Man’s Jacket - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
1900-S Liberty Gold $5 Coin and 1875-S Silver Trade Dollar - US Coinsin US Coins
British Victorian Cavalryman’s Jacket - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
1890 Improved Order of Red Men Certificate - Paperin Paper
CVG Stamped Wheat Cent - US Coinsin US Coins
French Tirailleur Officer’s Jacket - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Haitian Bring-Back M-5 Bayonet - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
WWI Veteran’s Model 1917 Jacket - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Leather Leggings Converted from Boots - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
US Army Wool Wrap Puttees - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…

Comments

  1. yes to Norfolk. RFA=Royal Field Artillery. Go ask your brother anyway, it's a good excuse to chat :)
  2. Lets see - Left to right, top row: US Army Europe (USAEUR), First Army (after WWII a stateside unit), 2nd Armor Division (mostly Ft Hood Texas), upside-down Staff Sergeant's rank Second row: First ...
  3. Familiar with the joke, just trying for a witty comeback. :)
  4. "leave no tern unstoned"? Are you accusing me of throwing rocks at aquatic birds? :)
  5. Nope, this coat ends below the waist. Otherwise the cuffs would be below the bottom of the jacket.
  6. Exactly. The Model 1881 dress helmet was used by the US Army from 1881 till about 1904. For decades afterwards, costume companies and "military clothiers" bought them cheap and then sold them to ...
  7. Ah, you caught me playing fast and loose with terms! Technically speaking, a "shell jacket" ended at the waist. Sack coats were intended to end near the hips. These were replaced by campaign coats li...
  8. TubeAmp caught the zip code on your tricorn hats. Same company here, but I think they had these in stock as military surplus. Lots of these helmets ended their days with school bands and such.
  9. Well, this was a very good find, and I would love to adopt this helmet and take it home with me where it would be well cared for. Unfortunately the rule against "solicitations to by or sell" keep me ...
  10. This is a U.S. Army Cavalry dress helmet, Model of 1881. Side buttons should show crossed swords. Because of the cloth over cork construction, many of these haven't lasted over time, and I see t...
  11. I enjoyed figuring it out. What can I say, I'm a nerd. I'm probably in your "generation" or not far behind you, and I agree this item did make sense for the times. I used to love Numrich Arms and...
  12. Hi Folks! In my original post, I said I wasn't sure whether the "H Carabinier" title was correct for this jacket. After consulting with another forum, I learned a few things. In the interest of ful...
  13. sure, I'll take a crack at it.
  14. This is a German model 1884/98 bayonet, second pattern. 84/98s never had three rivets, and were used in both world wars. That the blade is bright and that it has a brand name instead of a manufactur...
  15. Found it I think it! I’ve found three separate references to 1960s/70s Trapdoor conversions, but sold as kits by Numrich, not made in-house by Bannerman. According to the first thread, your barrel...
  16. No, that barrel length does not match any model I know of, and since TD barrels are tapered and yours fits the stock so nicely, it is hard to believe it's a non-standard replacement – but let’s see: ...
  17. "Hurricane Gonad" - now that name paints a gruesome picture!
  18. Blunder, I agree with you about the hammer being not quite right. I assume it was part of the conversion to percussion.
  19. Hi jwendell, I'm confused at what you are saying after your post correcting your numbers. According to my data, and overall length of the TD should be 51.9", and a barrel length of 32.6". How again do...
  20. Blunder, did you see the British Victorian cavalryman’s jacket I posted? That was my weekly post. This was something extra. Thanks for the input on grading Poop - I was debating between EF and VF ...
  21. More modern conversion would also explain that hooded bead front sight.
  22. Very nice.
  23. the 1888 stamp on the stock is the Armory Master's Cartouche, SWP is Samuel W. Porter, and 1888 is the year he inspected the arm. The problem is that in 1888 he should have been inspecting Trapdoor S...
  24. This looks more like a cudgel or bludgeon, and not a military item like a swagger stick or baton might be. That there seems to be no markings makes me lean more away from formal military issue, and m...
  25. Funny. I have no siblings, but I do have things from my grandparents that my cousins would really like to "borrow".
  26. Nice pictures and write-up.
  27. This is a US Army model 1902 Officer's Sword. They were/are the regulation sword of the US Army from 1902 to present, although more recent swords have mostly black plastic handles, older swords handl...
  28. P.S. - Happy Thanksgiving Canada
  29. All righty then, I'll just put this with the other wheats. I'm thinking about keeping all the pennies up to 1981, plus one penny for each year and mint after that year, and then cashing in the remain...
  30. There are other variations, but basically: from 1886 till 1916: Nickel steel handle, hooked quillion, a bit over 25 inches long overall. 1916 - 1935: Same as above but without the quillion and with...
  31. “Éliminer le pantalon rouge? Jamais ! Le pantalon rouge, c'est la France!” (Get rid of the red pants? Never! The red pants, that's France!) - Eugene Etienne, War Minister, in a cabinet meeting on the ...
  32. I always look forward to your comments, Blunder. Actually red trousers and caps were pretty typical colors in the French army, although the M.C. Hammer style parachute pants (how many here are too yo...
  33. The United States Military Academy has had a visitors center on campus since 1951, and I'm willing to bet it had a gift shop for almost all of that time. It did when I first visited the Point in the ...
  34. Actually, I was a bit surprised at myself that I knew enough about this item to find an example online. My normal field of collecting is military, but I know people who collect toys and I guess the k...
  35. I agree with you that it appears to be a match safe. I think I see a knurled area on the bottom for striking the matches?
  36. I got an identical patch in a Vietnam grouping I bought years ago. I'd also be interested in learning more from the folks here.
  37. Fascinating information on the charity behind the poem and products like your striker (pictured on the page) here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Absent-Minded_Beggar
  38. It is a child's secret decoder badge. ROA stands for Radio Orphan Annie, and the smaller SS beneath stands for Secret Society. During the Little Orphan Annie radio show, a "secret message" was broad...
  39. George V (1910-36) cypher, so the question would be which generation served during that era, your father or great uncle?
  40. The problem with talking about Haiti is I've got so many strange and crazy stories from the place, I can't decide which to tell, and I don't want to spend too much time off the topic of collectables. ...
  41. CIA Station Chief once said to me that if he reported all the weird, stupid things that happened in Haiti, he'd probably be recalled and undergo psych evaluation. We actually had people who believed ...
  42. I meant not much "Street crime" while the Duvaliers were around. Tons of street crime when I was there.
  43. I gotta go to work, but I'll write a couple more Haiti stories here later
  44. Well, I guess there was there wasn't much "Street crime" but a lot of corruption, torture and killing. Baby Doc was probably involved in the drug trade as well, but he was anti-communist, so he was a...
  45. Love the Browning Hi-Power. Thanks for the love geo26e, fortapache, ttomtucker, Manikin, stephfather, racer4four, kerry10456, blunder and Jewels.
  46. Nice bit of German-baiting. Sort of the "Trash Talking" of WWI.
  47. Thanks for the love fortapache, Manikin, blunder, southcop and racer4four
  48. Thanks for the love fortapache, blunder, southcop, racer4four and scottvez
  49. Thanks for the love fortapache, blunder, southcop, racer4four and scottvez
  50. I would think this item was made after the armistice of 11 Nov 1918, and not long after the New Year 1919 as when that's when people would have been buying calendars. Although Treaty of Versailles was...
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