Chrisnp

United States

Militaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1919, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm alsoMilitaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1919, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm also acquiring a collection of WWI British Army line infantry other ranks cap badges. Another aspect of my collecting is the acquisition of firearms and accessories from this ’61 to ’19 era. I’m a retired Army Warrant Officer with a lifelong interest in the lives of soldiers of the past, and the items they used and wore. I’ve been collecting militaria for about 40 years now, and enjoy sharing what I’ve learned as well as continuing to learn from others. (Read more)

Posts

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Leather Leggings Converted from Boots - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
US Army Wool Wrap Puttees - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
US Army Model 1910 Canvas Leggings (Gaiters) - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Gurkha and Indian Cap Badges - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
WWI Canadian Cap Badges and Shoulder Title - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
British Arms and Services Cap Badges - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
1939: The Original Food Stamp - Paperin Paper
British Royal Artillery Cap Badges - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
British WWI New Branch Cap Badges - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
British Foot Guards Cap Stars/Badges - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…

Comments

  1. Early Yale Skull & Bonesmen
  2. I think I was the only dog with a bone. Riply and Scott quit some time ago, then Southcop came in to keep me going. I think with the exception of one exchange, the conversation was respectful and in...
  3. I'm surprised I got any "loves" on these things - I was debating if I'd even post them. They were part of a larger lot and was far more interested in the other items. They could be civilian use - po...
  4. No blunder, we' ve just began! Frankyone, thanks for posting! Sounds like you wiki'd that, Southcop. It’s ok, I copied a bit of the same verbage for my post. As I said in #23 above, puttee origi...
  5. Scott, I have to print a retraction ;( I've been writing a post on leggings, and found out the wrap-around putties were first issued to the AEF in France in 1917, and only became standard throughou...
  6. No, blunder. This is just getting interesting! Gaiters is probably the most specific word, leggings is just more recognizable. The term "puttees" was also used for this item, but the origin of that...
  7. Oops - my bad - I meant web in WWII, canvas had been replaced by then, but still gaiters and ankle high shoes
  8. Actually Ripley, canvas gaiters were still issued when the US entered WWII.
  9. In my younger days when a few WWI/post WWI vets were still around, I spoke with two who both cursed the wraps. One insisted they gave soldiers varicose veins.
  10. I'll wager you'll see more wool wraps on enlisted men just out of training and waiting to go overseas in 1917, and far less of them in studio shots of returning soldiers in 1918!
  11. In my first post, perhaps I should have typed "non-standard issue" instead of "unauthorized" as I'm not sure what was allowed in theater given the frequent unavailability of some items.
  12. When the US entered the war, enlisted men other than mounted were issued wool wrap-around leggings. These were very unpopular fro the reasons I mentioned above. At some point during the war, the arm...
  13. Call 'em leggings, gaiters or puttees, but not chaps. These don't seem to match the pattern of the model 1911 quartermaster issue gaiters. I'm not sure if there were other all leather patterns o...
  14. Here's a related post http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/112244-nepali-kukri
  15. Thanks for the love, Roycroftbooksfromme1, Blunder and bratjdd. I notice only three "Loves". I wonder if people are getting tired of my enthusiasm for British cap badges. Bear with me. I only hav...
  16. Can't make out the unit patch, but recognize the "I don't wanna watch while she pokes me" expression on your patient (Same one I use). Chris
  17. 96B and then went on to be a crime scene analyst? Nice. I was in a related military field, and frequently had 96Bs working for me. True that this is not the forum for that discussion, but the skill s...
  18. I could list a lot of British units that took a horrendous beating too, Blunder, but this post is about Canada.
  19. I'm reminded of another example of a breast badge on headgear. Years ago when I left the Army, I gave my girlfriend one of my airborne berets. At some other point she got my air assault wings. Last ...
  20. This week was a busy one. We've got unusually dry weather for this time of year, and I'm trying to make the best use of it by getting some painting done each day after work before the fall rains star...
  21. maybe I should have waited to research before I speculated in my first post. I now think this may be a WWII era version of the Reichskriegerbund (Veteran's association) cap. If the inside says "...
  22. The Denazification program initiated by the Allies soon after WWII banned the wearing of any insignia with a swastika. I think either the two pieces came together to create a fantasy piece, or it migh...
  23. I've walked that battlefield as well. It's a beautiful place on a fall day, yet easy to imagine what happened there. Chris
  24. Very nice reference
  25. This isn't my area of collecting, but I'm guessing this was intended for radio station broadcast, so that special turntable was something they would have. I googled "The Martin Block Show", and wow, ...
  26. Military dress swords, like the fraternal swords, were never intended for battle. They do share those qualities you mentioned.
  27. I'm pretty sure this is an Imperial German artillery dress sword, my best guess on age is from the last half of the 19th century or possibly the early 20th century. "SACHS" is often an abbreviation...
  28. I think the man in a top hat looks more like a cowboy, and he's wearing chaps! It still works with the Churchill connection, because after all, Winston's mother was American :)
  29. Oh, and I do document any oral history that comes with an item, but oral histories are not solid provenance, especially when it comes from a seller who got the item from a friend who got it from his b...
  30. I'll spend considerably more for an item with solid provenance than one without any.
  31. Another great post. I like the small touches, like the dog's paws overlapping the frame, Added to the V-formation and ships in the background, the image has a great feeling of depth. I also have...
  32. It looks like the Pattern 1853 Enfield bayonet, and the measurements you give are close. If so, the socket inside diameter would be about 23/32 of an inch. I'm stumped on the markings. Are you su...
  33. These graphics are wonderful! thanks for sharing
  34. Of course there were Waterbury buttons used by the confederates, but you can always tell these because the confederates would scratch off the offending state name with the tips of their bayonets. O...
  35. Scot's right. It's Army. No doubt. Although there are variations in coloration, engraving and finish, it is also true that there were standard patterns for both Army and Luftwaffe, and this is the Ar...
  36. Here's a URL that will shed some light on your "ES DEVS SPES NOSTRA" (God is our hope) button: http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/what/15409-esx-devs-spes-nostra-what.html And as for the Louisian...
  37. As for the document, although the photo is mostly illegible, I’m pretty sure by the format and what I can read that this is a death card. If you do a google images search for “WWII German Death Cards...
  38. Ah, so I was also mistaken! I knew I should have looked it up, but just went from memory - I've seen that URL before.
  39. Actually Roycroft, that's a common myth that's been around for years now. The actual reason is that the notch was mated up to a protrusion on the stamping machine to keep the tag from slipping while...
  40. Update on this post: The part where I say "The farmhouse my Great Great Grandpa built on his homestead there still stands." is no longer true. It was torn down recently to make way for a new housing...
  41. Hi racer4four, Yes there is still a Veterinary Corps, now known as the Royal Veterinary Corps and with a different badge. Of course they are a much smaller force these days. As you mentioned, th...
  42. well, I've always found that getting some tail is worth the wait, although not so far from painters.
  43. Blunder, I only recognized it because I have several items from this battalion.
  44. Scott is the go-to guy on trench art, but I would guess that the match box may go higher. It appears to have the WWI cap badge of the 27th Battalion (City of Winnipeg), CEF attached to it. If it wer...
  45. In regards to whether the Germans used .22 rifles in WWII, I do know they were used as training rifles by the Germans to save on the cost of ammunition.
  46. Even better!
  47. Very nice to have this and the brother's pair as well. Was the Princess Mary Christmas Gift box also with the medals?
  48. I was surfing around trying to figure this out, and although I have no idea if there is a really a connection, I learned that the French Alpine Club, of which Chambery was a charter member, was starte...
  49. Thanks for flipping around the photo - I was getting tired on doing a headstand ;)
  50. By the way, on the epier URL, the seller does state his is a reproduction, but then claims if his were real it would sell for $3,000. The seller may have pulled that figure out of his posterior extre...
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