Chrisnp

The Great Northwestern United States

Militaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1920, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm alsoMilitaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1920, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm also interested in WWI British Army cap badges. Another aspect of my collecting is the acquisition of firearms, swords and accessories from this same ’61 to ’20 era. I’m a retired Army Warrant Officer with a lifelong interest in the lives of soldiers of the past, and the items they used and wore. I’ve been collecting militaria for over 40 years now, and enjoy sharing what I’ve learned as well as continuing to learn from others. (Read more)

Posts

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Victorian Gothic Hilt Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
West Point Shot Glasses - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Memorial Flags - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
1840/1906 Hollywood Frankensword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Roseville Stoneware Lipped Baby’s Plate - China and Dinnerwarein China and Dinnerw…
U.S. 1850 Style Foot Officer’s Sword with Movie Connection - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
U.S. Model 1860 Cavalry Saber - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
U.S. Model 1840 Style Cavalry Sabers - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
U.S. Model 1840 Style Light Artillery Saber - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
US Model 1832 Foot Artillery Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…

Comments

  1. Very cool. I had not realized King Vittorio Emmanuel III remained on the throne through Mussolini's rule, and had to go read up on it. I'm happy for the education!
  2. I meant D.A., not D.D. - I guess I was too focused on the spelling of "Nohascheck"
  3. This is Imperial German Army artillery officer's sword, and the inscription helps pin it down. D.D. Nohascheck was a sword dealer in Mainz between 1890 and 1915. I am not sure, but I believe "Hofsch...
  4. Thanks for the love petey, ttomtucker, racer4four, surfdub66, fortapache, Jewels, blunder, scottvez, aghcollect and officialfuel.
  5. Thanks all - now on to the real post for this week!
  6. Yes, I've noticed no good category for this sort of thing. I left my commemorative rifle posts in the "General (Multi-Category)" category. On the other hand, CW is not shy about re-categorizing i...
  7. You are on the right track, Scott
  8. No guesses yet? Awwww.
  9. I've seen these pop up on eBay, and am always tempted to make a bid, because I know of no other nation that thought to do such a thing.
  10. Crap! I meant NOT comming off like a know-it-all jerk!
  11. Sorry guys, but I have to toss in my two cents again. I hope I’m coming off like a know-it-all jerk. In the late 19th Century, the bayonet was considered a form of fencing. When parrying the enemy...
  12. I wonder by what route the North Korean version made it out of country.
  13. Oh, the Burton quotes are from his 1883 book "The Book of the Sword" which was reprinted by Dover Publishing in 1987
  14. I've mentioned this before, but... In 1883, Author Richard Burton (Not the actor!) wrote “The ‘curved thrust’ (of the North African Yataghan sword) so imposed upon Colonel Mercy, of the French army...
  15. Thanks fortapache, I do try to make my posts entertaining and enlightening.
  16. The only time I believe I had a bonafide confederate sword in my hands, I let it slip away through lack of knowledge. I was in a junk-tique shop on a trip to Galveston Texas, and ran across an 1840 s...
  17. the WCC on the holster probably stands for Western Costume Company - They supplied costumes and props to all the major movie studios at that time. I just posted another WCC marked item in this catego...
  18. Thanks for the love petey, battlegear, racer4four, Jewels, ttomtucker, SEAN68, CindB, officialfuel, blunder and aghcollect.
  19. To my knowledge, these types of belt buckles were never officially sanctioned by the Army as a whole, but they seem to have proliferated anyway.
  20. Army Emergency Relief (AER) was founded in 1942 as a non-profit organization, and is still operating today. It's not directly funded by the Federal Government and mostly relies on donations. Most U.S...
  21. I hope you know I mean no offence to you or your late cousin, and my condolences if you were close.
  22. Also, just a generation earlier, bayonets were accounting for a third of battlefield deaths. Since generals seem to be always fighting the last war instead of the one in front of them, it's not a myst...
  23. aghcollect, that was what I was thinking too, but didn't understand why it would make things look farther away.
  24. Well, whether it was zero or less than one percent is nit-picking on my part. Take care friend.
  25. I suspect experienced soldiers saw no reason to sharpen swords or bayonets. Sabers were not made to take a knife's edge sharpening and socket bayonets were for thrusting. I strongly suspect the trian...
  26. Western style sword blade edges are at an angle of around 40 degrees, whereas a butcher knife might be 10 degrees, so a sword's edge is more akin to an axe than a knife. It's intended to be swung har...
  27. asterisk shoulda been an 8
  28. For $* you couldn't go wrong! It's a Model 1873 Italian Cavalry Trooper's Sword. Here's an example: https://www.antiqueswords.com/product/BQ3380/A-Fine-M1873-Italian-Cavalry-Trooper-s-Sword.html...
  29. End of the 19th century, Blunder. In fact I think this example fit the model 1895 Forrage cap. Unfortunately I'm still on my iPhone and away from my reference books.
  30. I'm answering from work on my iPhone, so I don't have my references handy, but at a glance i'd say Spanish American War era
  31. Thanks Alibi! I see your first post was a couple months ago, so belated welcome to CW. Always happy to get another knowledgeable militaria enthusiast here. Your post cleared up a few issues I had w...
  32. Always interested in these last man stories. Thanks for sharing.
  33. Thanks for the love Militarist, fortapache, pw-collector, blunder, filmnet, Manikin, CindB, scott, surfdub66, aghcollect, Jewels and SEAN68.
  34. I've found several examples of swords with spirals cut into the wood like the sword I posted last week, and with smooth with string wrapped under the leather. Sometimes the leather is deteriorated aw...
  35. Thanks for the love southcop, officialfuel, Armyeng, Jewels, walksoftly, DrFluffy, blunder and vetraio50.
  36. The crossed sword and quill pen (not arrow) is the insignia of the Judge Advocate General. An Army JAG Officer would wear these on the lapels of his greens or blues dress jacket. Chris
  37. Unfortunately, I don't have any pre-1840 American swords. I have noticed the Eagle Heads are surprisingly less expensive and plan to one day get a nice example of one. Chris
  38. The ones I've posted; the 1840 NCO and 1840 Musician's Swords, 1832 Foot Artillery, and now the 1840 Light Artillery Saber. I suppose I should include the 1860 Staff and Field I posted as one of the C...
  39. My best guess is that this was a souvenir piece for someone who spent time in the Pacific, as some of these weapon styles look Indonesian. If so, I think the construction would make it an early examp...
  40. Yes Scott, but I do think the unmarked ones make good space fillers if you want to collect one of each official government pattern of Civil War sword, which is what I wanted to do. I'll be posting a c...
  41. It does have a certain theatrical flair Scott. Thanks for the love petey, CindB, battlegear, lzenglish, Jewels, Militarist, Manikin, southcop, DrFluffy, fortapache, aghcollect and officialfuel. ...
  42. Well, if you were on foot, this would certainly be better to carry and use - if mounted, the saber had better reach, was better at slashing at the enemy while mounted, and not much problem to carry si...
  43. Yes, I doubt it was used as a weapon often either. It's cold here, and when I picked it up just now, I got a chill from the cold brass. I can only imagine grasping it when it's been outside in the d...
  44. WWII era Warrant Officer rank insignia
  45. The shell casing is 8mm Lebel, but the bullet is not the Balle-D round. I am guessing a piece of steel, turned on a lathe. No idea what the slot is about. Perhaps Scott can enlighten us. The crow...
  46. Sorry but the eagle was not depicted that way in the American military until 1902. I think the fastener may have had a different original purpose. Chris
  47. The clutch pins would indicate WWII or later.
  48. Thanks for the love Battlegear, Blunder, Racer4four and Jewels. Wish you well down in the islands Blunder. I always imagine you living like you are in some Jimmy Buffett song down there, and sorry...
  49. I've found one second-hand source that places this as early 20th century, but I don't have the right references, so won't confirm it. NYSA is for New York State Artillery. Had a connection with the ...
  50. Yes, pre-WWII, and probably closer to WWI. Also yes, the 107th was part of the New York National Guard. All National Guard regiments were numerically numbered from 101 through 300 at the start of WW...
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