Chrisnp

The Great Northwestern United States

Militaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1920, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm alsoMilitaria collector; US, European and Japanese from 1861-1920, with an ephasis on WWI and a particular interest in the WWI Interallied Victory Medal series. I'm also interested in WWI British Army cap badges. Another aspect of my collecting is the acquisition of firearms and accessories from this same ’61 to ’20 era. I’m a retired Army Warrant Officer with a lifelong interest in the lives of soldiers of the past, and the items they used and wore. I’ve been collecting militaria for over 40 years now, and enjoy sharing what I’ve learned as well as continuing to learn from others. (Read more)

Posts

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U.S. Model 1840 Style Light Artillery Saber - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
US Model 1832 Foot Artillery Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Civil War US Model 1840 Musician’s Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Civil War Era US Model 1840 Noncommissioned Officer Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
19th Century Militia NCO Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Vintage Christmas Cards - Christmasin Christmas
1914 Christmas Truce Centenial - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Patriotic Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
Model 1860 Staff & Line Officer’s Sword - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…
General Officer's Sash & Dress Hanger with 1902 Saber - Military and Wartimein Military and Wart…

Comments

  1. The crossed sword and quill pen (not arrow) is the insignia of the Judge Advocate General. An Army JAG Officer would wear these on the lapels of his greens or blues dress jacket. Chris
  2. Unfortunately, I don't have any pre-1840 American swords. I have noticed the Eagle Heads are surprisingly less expensive and plan to one day get a nice example of one. Chris
  3. The ones I've posted; the 1840 NCO and 1840 Musician's Swords, 1832 Foot Artillery, and now the 1840 Light Artillery Saber. I suppose I should include the 1860 Staff and Field I posted as one of the C...
  4. My best guess is that this was a souvenir piece for someone who spent time in the Pacific, as some of these weapon styles look Indonesian. If so, I think the construction would make it an early examp...
  5. Yes Scott, but I do think the unmarked ones make good space fillers if you want to collect one of each official government pattern of Civil War sword, which is what I wanted to do. I'll be posting a c...
  6. It does have a certain theatrical flair Scott. Thanks for the love petey, CindB, battlegear, lzenglish, Jewels, Militarist, Manikin, southcop, DrFluffy, fortapache, aghcollect and officialfuel. ...
  7. Well, if you were on foot, this would certainly be better to carry and use - if mounted, the saber had better reach, was better at slashing at the enemy while mounted, and not much problem to carry si...
  8. Yes, I doubt it was used as a weapon often either. It's cold here, and when I picked it up just now, I got a chill from the cold brass. I can only imagine grasping it when it's been outside in the d...
  9. WWII era Warrant Officer rank insignia
  10. The shell casing is 8mm Lebel, but the bullet is not the Balle-D round. I am guessing a piece of steel, turned on a lathe. No idea what the slot is about. Perhaps Scott can enlighten us. The crow...
  11. Sorry but the eagle was not depicted that way in the American military until 1902. I think the fastener may have had a different original purpose. Chris
  12. The clutch pins would indicate WWII or later.
  13. Thanks for the love Battlegear, Blunder, Racer4four and Jewels. Wish you well down in the islands Blunder. I always imagine you living like you are in some Jimmy Buffett song down there, and sorry...
  14. I've found one second-hand source that places this as early 20th century, but I don't have the right references, so won't confirm it. NYSA is for New York State Artillery. Had a connection with the ...
  15. Yes, pre-WWII, and probably closer to WWI. Also yes, the 107th was part of the New York National Guard. All National Guard regiments were numerically numbered from 101 through 300 at the start of WW...
  16. Yep, $1,000 for a rare and unusual Confederate battle implement does not surprise me.
  17. Hmmm...I looked up "Confederate Bridle Cutter Pike", and I must say this looks like it. If it is, it would be a pretty rare thing, and worth the time to let some experts handle it. On closer exami...
  18. Looks like a logger's pike - if you go to Google images and type in "logger's pike", you'll see what I mean.
  19. Hey! I think I knew that NCO! While I was in Iraq about 2004, I saw Chocolate Chip being issued to the new Iraqi Army I guess the US hadn't gotten rid of it all yet. Found this photo off the 'net ...
  20. Ttom is right, however, you have campaign stars on your ribbons, which tell more, as these were actions against the enemy. I'll wager your grandfather was in the Navy because his American campaign ri...
  21. Glad you continue to hang around Blunder. The next several posts will be CW swords.
  22. I should add that not all numbers within the" traceable range" are actually traceable. there are web sites that offer to check the number for you.
  23. Ok, not rare - but certainly of interest to collectors of this period. Although you already know the name of the recipient, I believe this serial number falls within the range of "traceable" Navy Mexi...
  24. Sorry for not getting back with you sooner. The long number you mention could be the 11 digit Federal Supply Number (SFS), used until about 1974, or the 13 digit National Stock Number (NSN), officia...
  25. Post 'em! I'm always happy to make wild guesses about objects I know absolutely nothing about.
  26. Must be some great barns in your neck of the woods! My M-16 also had camo at one point, but then got repainted and decaled circa WWII. Now the decals are barely outlines and the repaint is worn do...
  27. Buffer? Nah. I'd blast it with WD-40 and scrub it with a course non-scratch brush. Knowing me, I'd spend the next decade or two looking for parts, and be happy if the parts match the condition of t...
  28. PS: There is high scrap metal value in Bronze, being mostly copper. Sadly the WWI memorial in my town had all the bronze plaques ripped off of it one night by thieves. The plaques have since been...
  29. Looks like both tanks are the same model. - Based on the angular turret and bodies, I'd say German Panzer Vs.
  30. No solid information here, but I agree it isn't 1960s kitsch. There's no reason that stuff would be marked 1914, and this thing seems made better. If more coppery than brassy, perhaps this is bronze...
  31. Thanks for the love AzTom, fortapache, officialfuel, aghcollect, Jewels, vetraio50, walksoftly, CindB, racer4four and blunder.
  32. If I were afoot, as I believe most issued this sword were, I'd prefer this to the Wrist Breaker. More than the next couple swords I'll be posting, for sure Chris
  33. Always good to see your posts, petey.
  34. United States Marine Corps Jacket, Lance Corporal Stripes on the arms. Check for labels on the inside that might show a date. Could be Vietnam era, maybe later. Probably authentic as I don't think t...
  35. Thanks for the love ttomtucker, blunder, Alan2310, trunkman, CindB, Jewels, surfdub66, ho2cultcha and bratjdd
  36. What? Don't ya like that red chunk of cloth I found?? Just kidding. Thanks racer4four
  37. I can't tell you about the blade, but the mounts are typical of WWII swords. Much older blades sometimes appear with WWII mounts, so I wouldn't count the whole thing as WWII era. Even if it is that e...
  38. I can't help thinking she's holding a beer glass in her left hand
  39. Funny story Scott. It reminds me of a French St Etienne Arsenal bayonet for sale as a "Traceable Confederate Officer's Bayonet" I saw once. It was supposedly traceable because the spine was engrave...
  40. What markings does yours have? Chris
  41. I did a write-up on this model here about three years ago. Hope the info is useful: http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/44193-italian-model-1889-ordinance-revolver
  42. I tried looking up several state seals, thinking that was what the center was, but without luck.
  43. yep, right above the guard and below the bone handle.
  44. Thanks for the love racer4four, walksoftly, aghcollect and fortapache.
  45. Thanks for the love walksoftly, RosaChan, racer4four, Jewels, PatSea, nutsabotas6 and aghcollect
  46. the URL does not connect to a craft done at our center, but an online photo of the type of craft we did.
  47. Hi nutsabotas6. These were donated to the non-profit I work for, I don’t know when they were donated or by whom. They ended up in a bin with about a thousand other Christmas cards that were collected ...
  48. I do! but only because I discovered this one. Wouldn't it pair up nicely with yours! http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/112663-christmas-train-blotting-paper-advert
  49. Great ad! Thanks for sharing!
  50. Love it! - looks to have a swagger stick behind him to match the attitude of the pose!
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